New classes starting soon! Introduction to Modern Quilting

I am really excited to make this announcement! Nancy’s is introducing a new series of classes, to be taught by yours truly: an introduction to modern quilting.

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This class series will cover the basics of quilt making, focusing on the construction of several basic quilt blocks, all with a modern bent. In each section, we will cover the following:

  • basic quilt math
  • piecing and trimming quilt blocks
  • assembling a quilt top
  • quilting on a sewing machine
  • plus! we will go over how to sew the quilted blocks into a throw pillow cover, including installation of an invisible zipper

Each three-week section will concentrate on a single, foundational style of quilt block, how to make it, and it’s versatility. It is amazing to see just how far one block will take you!

First up: the ever classic nine patch! Arguably the most foundational quilt block style, the nine patch utilizes techniques that are used for making everything from the smallest to the largest quilt.

NSB - IMQ 9P pillow

A throw pillow in a classic nine patch, made with five smaller nine patch blocks. It’s like Inception, made from patchwork.

The second section of classes will focus on the half-square triangle. This is one of my very favorite blocks for its cool, graphic style, plus it can be arranged in a million ways for very different effects. Well, maybe not a literal million ;)

NSB - IMQ HST pillow

The versatile half-square triangle can be rotated to create a variety of patterns.

The third block we will explore is the log cabin. Another personal favorite, this block is versatile and provides techniques that are helpful for larger quilt assembly.

NSB - IMQ Log Cabin pillow

These log cabins have been arranged in the ‘fields and furrows’ style.

These classes will take place at Nancy’s Sewing Basket. Each section is $75 and includes all materials needed to create a black and white quilted pillow cover. As with our other sewing classes, we have sewing machines and a tool kit for students use.

Our first section of classes, the nine patch, will take place on Thursdays 8/13, 8/20, and 8/27 from 6:00 to 8:00pm.

Additional details, and our full class schedule through the end of 2015, can be found here.

Any questions? Let us know in the comments below!

Color-wheel quilt

Hello! Jessica here. Today I am thrilled to share with you a recent quilting project! (You may even remember that I mentioned this quilt in my interview!)

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Using the pattern from Joelle Hoverson’s book Last-Minute Patchwork + Quilted Gifts, I made a color-wheel quilt featuring Kona cotton solids from Robert Kaufman.

NSB - JH last minute patchwork book cover

The original design uses printed cottons to create beautiful color movement with lots of visual texture.

NSB - JH color-wheel quilt in book

I love the way this looks, but decided I wanted to try it out with solid colors. We carry the Kona cotton line at Nancy’s, offering a decent selection of the 303 colors (!) that Robert Kaufman makes. I planned to make this color-wheel using clear, saturated colors.

Because the color-wheel is comprised of 52 wedges, I set to work choosing all my colors, beginning with some of my favorites hues and filling in where necessary. In the book, Hoverson recommends creating quadrants of 13 colors for ease in planning, which was incredibly helpful. I made a color inventory to keep track of exactly what colors I would use and where I wanted them to sit in the wheel.

NSB - color-wheel quilt color inventory

I wish I’d taken a photo of my selection process, but I actually started by pulling out and lining up the full bolts of Kona, just to ensure I had the best colors. When I couldn’t find exactly the right transition color in stock, I checked against the Kona color card and made a note of what we should order in for the store.

The color inventory came in very handy when it was time to cut my fabrics and again later when I was assembling my quilt top.

NSB - color-wheel stack of fabrics

This pattern was very fun and easy to construct. The recommended quilting (straight quilting radiating from the center, using the color wedges as guides) is fairly simple and has an incredible effect. I used washable wool batting for this quilt, which has a gorgeous loft.

In addition to using solid colors rather than prints, I did one other major thing different from the book: where Hoverson calls for white fabric for the background, binding, and backing, I decided to use a very pale solid grey (Kona color Ash). I opted for this pale neutral largely because it reminds me of the Seattle sky, but also because I wanted the transition from ground to color-wheel to be less stark. I couldn’t be happier with the results.

NSB - color-wheel quilt complete

One thing I love about finishing a quilt and taking photographs is that you really get to see how the fabrics play with one another. I absolutely love that the lightest colors in my color-wheel look like they are shimmering.

This color-wheel quilt was super fun from start to finish. I love the versatility in how it can be made up: altering the fabric palette from prints to solids (or doing a mix of both), selecting a narrow color palette (e.g. using a two hue palette rather than a full rainbow), changing out the background color, and much more. I have had a lot of fun looking at the other color-wheel quilts that have been made using this pattern! Here are a few of my favorites:

Kelly of Purple Workbench made the color-wheel quilt as a wedding gift for her brother and sister-in-law, using their wedding palette as the color guide. Her fabric choices in teal, silver, and lime green are perfection! I also love how she quilted it using concentric circles for the wheel and added their initials and wedding date to the center.

Kristen at All Snug as a Bug changed the color of her background from white to black with awesome results. I love how it changes the effect!

Holly of Stitch Craft made one for her son, limiting her color palette to blues and greens. The effect is really lovely and very chic. She also made a matching curtain using her left-over fabric!

Dani of Knit, Stitch, Click! followed the pattern of the book quite closely, but added borders to make it fit a queen size bed! I love that she quilted the color-wheel as shown in the book, but changed the quilting in the added borders to create a kind of frame.

Tamara Kate, a talented fabric designer, used the pattern to create a modern holiday ‘wreath’ featuring her print lines Festive Forest and Festive Nest. She says it will be hung on a blank wall in her home every holiday season for additional color and warmth! Such a clever idea! I also love how she quilted this, leaving the center open, like a wreath.

Thanks for joining me today! Have a question? Let me know in the comments below!

Rococo ribbon rosettes

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Rococo ribbon is a fantastic ¼” wide 100% polyester ribbon with gradient color across the width and picot edging on both sides. We love this ribbon for many reasons, including its versatility in application and its ability as a trim to pull disparate fabrics together.

NSB - rococo ribbon colors

Today we are sharing a quick and easy-to-make flower using this fabulous ribbon! This little flower is the perfect addition to clothing (especially when sewn in clusters!), gifts and handmade cards, doll clothing and accessories, and so much more.

We made a fun short video tutorial to show you how to make a Rococo rosette. Hope you enjoy!

SUPPLIES & TOOLS

  • ‘Rococo’ ribbon, minimum cut of 3” (can substitute any 100% polyester ribbon in its stead, though you will need more length if you use a wider ribbon); each length will make two flowers
  • scissors
  • lighter or candle (flame needs to be accessible, so recommend tapers over votives)
  • ruler
  • floral stamens (optional)

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Cut a 3” to 4” length of ribbon
  2. Cut ribbon length in half at an angle
  3. Using lighter or candle, melt the squared end of the ribbon
  4. On the long angled cut, find and pull a thread close to the ribbon’s edge; this will create the gathers along the full ribbon length
  5. Holding gathers in place, use your flame to melt the angled cut edge
  6. Voila! You have made a Rococo ribbon rosette!
  7. Repeat steps 3 through 5 with the second half of your ribbon;
  8. Optional: If you want to add stamens, fold in half and insert into the flowers center; catch in place when sewing to your project

Embroidered ‘Guest Book’ Tablecloth

Today we are sharing a fun project that makes a fabulous keepsake to commemorate weddings, new homes, and more!

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Inspired by one of our customers, who uses a linen tablecloth to remember all the visitors to her house, we decided this project would make a unique and fun guest book for a wedding reception! One of the best parts: this can be added to throughout the years!

Our guest book tablecloth is a very simple project; it just requires time and basic embroidery skills (though it can certainly be made more challenging if you prefer ;) ).

We start by embroidering a pretty heart motif, along with the couple’s names and their wedding date to the center of a tablecloth.

NSB - emb tc embroider design

At the reception, guests use a washable ink pen to sign their names and well wishes on the tablecloth.

NSB - emb tc guests sign

We then make their signatures permanent by embroidering over them for posterity. The result is a lovely keepsake tablecloth!

NSB - emb tc completeNSB - emb tc close up

Interested in making a guest book tablecloth? Follow our quick tutorial below!

Guest Book Tablecloth Tutorial

We love all the opportunity for customization this project provides! This would make a lovely housewarming gift for a first home, including the tools needed to make it an ongoing project! It would also be fabulous for a 50th anniversary party! Making one for newlyweds? Incorporate their wedding motif or monogram and colors into the cloth! If it’s for someone who loves color, do the signatures in different hues! Alternately, use embroidery floss in a shade similar to the color of the cloth for a sophisticated, textured monochrome palette.

NSB - emb tc tutorial pattern fabric floss

SUPPLIES

  • Tablecloth for ‘guest book’; can be store-bought or hand-made (we made ours from 60” wide Essex, a linen/cotton blend, in white)
  • Embroidery pattern (commercial or your own motif)
  • Embroidery floss (for our central motif we used four shades each of leaf greens and rosy pinks-to-reds, plus a variegated brown and for all lettering we used a dark grey)
  • Washable ink pen for reception

TOOLS

  • Embroidery hoop
  • Needles
  • Iron

NOTE: We used an iron-on commercial pattern transfer for the heart motif and created our wording on the computer. If you want to use your own motif (e.g. your wedding motif or couples’ monogram) and do an iron transfer, be certain to make a mirror image of your motif to ensure you transfer correctly. You can also print as normal and trace your motif by hand using a light-box.

1. After determining where you would like your motif placed on the tablecloth, transfer your embroidery pattern.

NSB - emb tc tutorial iron transferNSB - emb tc tutorial check transferNSB - emb tc tutorial transfer complete

2. Embroider the motif.

NSB - emb tc tutorial frame motifNSB - emb tc tutorial begin embroidering

A note: some commercial embroidery patterns include specific color guides, but ours did not. We found the perfect inspiration in a tea saucer!

NSB - emb tc tutorial color movement

We used satin stitch for our floral heart motif and the couple’s names and backstitched the date.

When embroidery is complete, iron tablecloth in preparation of the event.

3. At wedding, lay out tablecloth with pens available for signing. To ensure no guest’s signature would impose on our main embroidery, we made a dotted outline around it.

NSB - emb tc tutorial guests sign

4. Using a simple stitch, embroider over guests signatures. We used a backstitch, which has a clean look and really allows the personality of each signature to shine.

Once your embroidery is complete, wash out the ink (according to the pen’s instructions when applicable), dry, iron. Your new tablecloth is ready for use!

NSB - emb tc tutorial finished tablecloth

Get to know a Nancy’s employee: Kitrina

Today we “get to know” our talented and prolific assistant store manager for Nancy’s Sewing Basket! She is the person responsible for the incredible 1927 Cloud Cape that we featured earlier this year. She also teaches our fabulous embroidery class: Hand Embroidery Basics! NSB - get to know kitrina Who are you? Hi! I’m Kitrina. How long have you worked at Nancy’s? I started when my youngest went to kindergarten. She turned 21 last week, so I’ve been with the store for 16 years. Although, before she was even born, I taught smocking classes at Nancy’s when we still had a classroom space.

NSB - kitrina smocking blue dress

NSB - kitrina smocking detail A smocked dress, with detail.

How long have you been sewing?
I’ve been sewing since I was six years old.

Do you have a special focus?
I like handwork. I love embroidery and embellishing, though I do all kinds of things. What do they say? ‘Jack of all trades, master of none.’

[editor’s note: I don’t agree. I feel like Kitrina is very much a master of anything she does.]

I’m adopted and my family of origin didn’t really keep stuff, but creating keepsakes for my own family gives me a charge. I have this embroidered piece that my great-grandmother made when she was eight. I put my spirit into the things I make, hoping that my work will keep me alive long after I’m gone.

I’ve had several focuses of interest, including heirloom sewing, smocking, and different kinds of embroidery, including crewel work.

NSB - kitrina heirloom christening gown

The christening gown Kitrina made for her daughter using washed silk dupioni. She says at the baptism, the priest asked how long this had been in the family and she was delighted to say, “About two weeks!”

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The hand embroidered inscription on the gown lining.

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The full set: christening gown, bonnet, and booties.

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A cotton dress and under-dress featuring heirloom sewing techniques and trimmings.

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A sweet embroidered inscription on the under-dress.

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A fun example of crewel work with applique and embroidery.

NSB - kitrina crewel baa detail

The bodies of these incredible sheep are made from french knots!

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Another blanket featuring crewel work.

Love the texture on the butterfly!

Love the texture on the butterfly!

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This bumble bee is three dimensional!

NSB - kitrina crewel snail trail

Check out that glistening snail trail!

What was your first sewing project?
Pre-printed pillowcases that my aunty gave me to embroider. She said, very seriously, ‘you can embroider these and give them to me for Christmas,’ which I did. This arrangement continued for many years until the one time I didn’t give them back and she stopped providing them to me. They were a great way to keep my hands busy.

What is your most recently completed project?
I take on projects for clients and I recently completed custom construction and alterations for four different brides. It was a fun and exciting spring wedding season, but I’m happy to have more time to work on other projects.

In my personal work, I recently created a keepsake memory pillow for my daughter’s twenty-first birthday. She had asked for us to have our portrait taken together, but I wasn’t really feeling it. Instead, I found lots of pictures of us from her lifetime (special thanks to my husband for always having a camera around!), which I printed onto fabric and then embellished with handwork.

NSB - kitrina memory pillow Do you have a most memorable or favorite project?
Most memorable was the first play that I costumed: The Lion King, for a local school. I’d never really done something of that scale before – there were 40 students in the production and zero budget. I soft sculpted headdresses out of fabric to make giraffes, elephants, a zebra, the lions, Rafiki the baboon, Timon the meerkat and Pumba the warthog, the three hyenas, and a chorus of singers. It was all very effective.

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Simba’s headdress

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Two of the three hyenas. Kitrina put Ed’s eyeballs on springs so they were especially erratic looking (on the left).

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Timon was a favorite costume.

In my personal work, I have a number of favorite, ongoing projects. I make boxers for my sons using the Italian shirting cottons offered at Nancy’s (I don’t think my sons have worn store-bought underwear since they were children). The quality of the fabric is incomparable; the elastic breaks down and the thread wears out, but the fabric remains intact. It’s awesome.

I also have eighty 10” x 10” crazy quilt squares that I work on little by little. My intention is to make the squares into four different throws: one quilt for myself and one for each of my three children.

Working at Nancy’s over the years, I have had opportunity to collect beautiful scraps of fabrics. One of my favorite things about crazy quilts is that small scraps are very effective.

When I decided to start working on this project, I went through my stash and started pulling anything in a palette of browns, golds, soft blues, and pinks. I began each block with a brown center, and then built around it with fabrics and embellishments.

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Nine of Kitrina’s 80 (!) crazy quilt squares

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A single block, chosen at random.

NSB - kitrina crazy quilt brown center

The brown center provides a subtle foundation for the embellishment and colors surrounding.

I work on a block until I’m tired of looking at it, then move on to another. Sometimes I will ‘audition’ a trim or an embroidery motif to decide if I like it; on occasion, I remove an embellishment.

Here are a few detail shots from different blocks: NSB - kitrina crazy quilt rich purple flowerNSB - kitrina crazy quilt velvet flowers NSB - kitrina crazy quilt scrolling vine NSB - kitrina crazy quilt sunflower detail

What project is next?
A beautiful iridescent chiffon gown for a Mother of the Groom. I am using a muted palette of mossy greens and soft golds. It’s for a destination wedding in Napa Valley. It is going to be such a fabulous event and I’m happy to be making something so incredible for it.

For myself: a new summer wardrobe! I am in love with the tunic pattern that is used in the DEF class and I’m currently working on renditions five, six, and seven.

What do you love most about Nancy’s?
The visual beauty of the store; it’s very nurturing to my spirit. And the women friends. I also really appreciate the owner of the store; it’s nice that they appreciate their staff.

Thanks so much to Kitrina for sharing her gorgeous work with us! Any questions for her? Leave them in the comments!

All photographs in this post are courtesy of Nancy’s Sewing Basket employee Kitrina and may not be used without express permission.

Rolling down my stockings and rouging my knees – part 4

Welcome back for the final installment of making my 1920s costume! I am very excited to share details about preparing the last part of my ensemble – my shoes – and to reveal my costume in its entirety!

NSB - 1920s costume header pt 4

One of the easiest and most fun components of my roaring twenties costume was the shoes. While the other components of my ensemble – my dress, headpiece, and purse – have a definite ‘costume’ feel to them, I knew I wanted my shoes to still translate into my regular wardrobe. I began researching 1920s evening shoes and found some amazing inspiration!

These incredible shoes have a place to hold a small lipstick on the heel! source

The 1920s were an interesting time for women’s footwear, because hemlines were suddenly short enough that shoes were always visible. As a result, every component of a shoe was fair game for embellishment, including the heel!

After drooling over all the incredible designs, I knew I wanted to add rhinestones to my heels! I searched for the right pair of shoes: something with a modest heel of an appropriate shape (the heel needed to be 2.5” or less and not too conical) and a Mary Jane or T-strap. Luckily for me, vintage-influenced styles are produced every season, so I knew it wouldn’t be impossible to find a good pair of shoes that met these criteria.

I found several pairs of shoes that were really fun, in bright colors like tangerine and citron, or with spectator styling. Unfortunately, these were either too tall or out of my price range, so I kept looking. I’m so glad I did, because I found just the right pair of shoes!

I love the Mary Jane styling with the sweet cut-outs and the solid shape of the heel. source

Once I had the shoes in hand, I planned out a simple-but-effective design for rhinestones on my heels. I began by making a template of my heel using white printer paper.

NSB - 1920s-style heels make a template

I sketched an outline, inspired by the shape of actual twenties heels.

NSB - 1920s-style heels sketch design

From there I created my motif and marked rhinestone placement.

NSB - 1920s-style heels create layout

I made holes in my template using an awl (a very thick needle, like a tapestry needle, would also work for this) and marked where my rhinestones should go using a white colored pencil.

NSB - 1920s-style heels rhinestone template

Then, I applied the rhinestones to one of the heels…

NSB - 1920s-style heels one shoe done

…and repeated on the second! I totally love how they turned out!

NSB - 1920s-style heels finished

Now that that’s out of the way, let’s move on the final reveal!

NSB - jessica's hazel's frock

I feel like this costume really needs a sound track! Let’s enjoy the Charleston!

NSB - jessica's hazel's frock side

“Charleston! Charleston!”

NSB - jessica's hazel's frock back

I love the view from the back, showing off the jaunty neck scarf and flashing my new heels.

Thanks so much for joining me through this whole process! It was incredibly fun to dream up and make this costume, and even better to share it!

If you have any feedback, questions, or ideas for what you’d like to see in the future, let me know in the comments below!

Rolling down my stockings and rouging my knees – part 3

I am so excited to share the third installment of making my 1920s costume; this week, I’m making a purse! I have plenty of lovely inspiration to share, along with a really neat tutorial. Let’s get started!

NSB - 1920s costume header pt 3

As with my dress and my headpiece, I began by researching twenties purse styles with a focus on evening bags. One of the best parts of 1920s garments and accessories for evening wear is the detailing: beading! tassels! fringe! rhinestones! And the list goes on and on!

One of my favorite styles to come across was the compact purse: a small substitute for an evening bag, created to carry only the necessities of make-up, lipstick, and maybe a little money.

The outside of a compact purse featuring enamel work. source

The inside shows spaces for a small lipstick, blush, and face powder, with a mirror on the reverse. source

I love that this is only big enough for a lipstick! source

The more standard styles of evening bag, whether a clutch or reticule, with a drawstring or a kisslock closure, had a bit more room for personal articles.

There was also an interesting hybrid that includes a compact as part of the bag frame.

After finding so many amazing examples, I decided to do a search for actual vintage purse patterns. In a perfect universe, I would have made a hand-beaded purse, complete with beaded tassels or fringe. However, in reality, I knew I wouldn’t have the time to bead anything. I checked ebay and Etsy for patterns, without finding much. One of the Folkwear patterns I had considered for my dress included a pattern for a simple drawstring-style bag, but it wasn’t exactly my preferred shape.

But then I found the best possible inspiration: a vintage instructional video from the 1920s in how to make a ‘dainty handbag’!

I find this video particularly charming because they skip so many of the steps in the actual creation of the purse! It was clearly made during a time when most people were practiced enough in sewing that they could easily fill in the gaps.

To a modern viewer, the use of crepe paper may seem absurd, but I was totally inspired by the concept of weaving fabric out of something colorful and flat. What if I were to update this idea by using something that is longer lasting, like ribbon? I decided to try it out!

I collected double-face polyester satin ribbons in a color palette to coordinate with my dress, pulling three shades each of blue, coral, and yellow. NSB - 1920s purse ribbons

Inspired by the silhouettes and details of a few of my favorite vintage purses, I decided to make a reticule with a drawstring, with a tassel hanging off the bottom.

Following the vintage tutorial, I wove my ribbons together and then sewed them into a purse! I am so happy with the results.

NSB - 1920s reticule

Are you interested in making a 1920s style purse of your very own? Follow the tutorial below!

1920s Reticule Purse Tutorial

When I go out, I like to have enough space in my handbag for my keys, lipstick, cell phone, and a small wallet for ID and money, but I didn’t want this purse to be too cumbersome. My finished purse measures approximately 8” wide by 9” tall, not including handles or tassel.

SUPPLIES

  • Ribbon: enough to weave two 12” x 12” squares, plus additional length to create loops for the handles. This requires a bit of math. I used 2yds each of 9 ribbons in different colors and widths (I wanted an uneven, dynamic effect to the fabric I wove). Use only one width of ribbon in one or two colors for a subtler look, or use different widths to create a graphic motif (this dress is made of woven ribbons!). If you use only 1” wide ribbon, you will need at least 16yds of ribbon. NOTE: I used double-face ribbon for this project, which increases the ease of weaving, but is not requisite. If you select a single face ribbon, you will just need to be more diligent during step 3.
  • 1/3yd fabric for underlining your woven ribbons, cut into two 12”x 12” pieces (I used black polyester organza, leftover from the neck scarf on my dress, which is nice because it is both rigid and lightweight)
  • 1/3yd fabric for lining the purse (I used black rayon/acetate satin faille, leftover from the slip I made to wear under my dress)
  • 2yds cording for handles
  • Thread
  • Embroidery floss or cording for tassel (if making your own) or a store-bought tassel

TOOLS

  • Sewing machine
  • Scissors
  • Paper to make purse pattern (I used 8 ½” x 11” white printer paper)
  • Spray baste (used for quilts, appliqué, etc.)
  • Marking tools (I used a Chaco-liner and 1” x 6” ruler)
  • Pins
  • Hand sewing needles

TUTORIAL

1. Cut ribbons into 12” lengths.

NSB - purse tutorial cut ribbons

2. Make paper pattern. Using the full width of my paper, I drew an approximate shape for the purse bottom and cut it out.

NSB - purse tutorial make paper pattern

3. Weave ribbons into two 12” x 12” squares. I started on a gridded mat by lining up my ribbons along a gridline so they are parallel to one another, then taping down along one edge. Once my ‘warp’ ribbons are in place, I began weaving in my ‘weft’ ribbons, keeping the weave as tight as possible. IMPORTANT: If you do not use double-face ribbon, you will need to weave your ribbons face down.

NSB - purse tutorial weave ribbons

4. Once a 12” x 12” square is completed, follow the instructions on your spray baste to prepare one side of an underlining fabric square. Place the sticky side of the underlining square on your woven ribbons; press in place.

NSB - purse tutorial place underlining on ribbons

Repeat steps 3 & 4 to make a second woven ribbon square with underlining.

5. Cut out your purse bodies. I added a ½” seam allowance around my paper pattern piece using a Chaco-liner and small ruler.

NSB - purse tutorial cut out purse body

Repeat this step with lining fabric.

NOTE: for this particular design, I made my lining exactly the same shape as my purse. If I were to make this purse shape again, I would actually change the lining shape so it does not come to the same point at the bottom. I believe this would allow the lining to better sit down inside the purse.

6. To help keep the woven ribbons intact, machine baste around edges within seam allowance, ensuring the ribbons don’t shift out of place.

NSB - purse tutorial machine baste ribbons to organza

7. Determine where you would like your ribbon loops to go at purse top. I chose to make it look like the ribbons are extending up as part of the woven effect; because my ribbon colors and widths were all different, my loops reflected this. Use 3” cuts of ribbon to make loops: fold ribbon in half, pin in place matching raw edges of ribbon to purse top. NSB - purse tutorial pin ribbon loops to top

8. Lay one purse lining piece over purse front, right sides together, aligning top edges. NSB - purse tutorial pin purse lining to front

Sew purse lining to purse front along top edge.

NSB - purse tutorial sew lining to front at top

9. Press open, with seam allowance toward lining.

NSB - purse tutorial press open

Repeat steps 7 through 9 for second purse front and lining piece.

10. With right sides together, pin the purse front/lining pieces together.

NSB - purse tutorial pin together

Sew together leaving an opening in lining for turning.

NSB - purse tutorial sew together

NSB - purse tutorial sewn with opening to turn

Notice the marked opening at the bottom left for turning.

11. Turn right side out and sew opening closed, either by machine or hand. I edge-stitch on my machine because it’s faster, but hand-sewing would allow for a hidden finish.

NSB - purse tutorial finish opening

I apologize for the terrible color of this photo; I had to blow it out in order to see the stitching, which is still very hard to see!

Stuff the lining inside the purse body. You may wish to iron the purse top to help keep it in place.

12. If you want to make your own tassel, do so now. I followed this tutorial to create mine. NSB - purse tutorial make a tassel

Sew to the bottom of your purse. Catch the lining, if applicable.

NSB - purse tutorial sew tassel to purse

13. For handles, cut cording into two 1yd pieces. Beginning on one side of the purse, thread one end of the cording through the ribbon loops, meeting the second end at the start. Knot the two cording ends together.

With the second piece of cording, start on the opposite side of the purse and thread through the loops. Knot ends.

NSB - purse tutorial thread handles through loops

You may need to adjust one of the knots so the handles hang evenly.

14. That’s it! You have a fabulous new purse! Take it out for a night on the town!

NSB - purse tutorial finished 1920s purse

Join me next time for the final installment! I will be sharing a fun way to update modern shoes to look like they are from the 1920s AND revealing my full costume! Until next time!