Fanciful Felt Fairy Ornaments

I am excited to announce a new class at Nancy’s: Fanciful Felt Fairy Ornaments!

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If you have visited our store in the past couple months, you will have seen wee figures dotting the landscape. These delightful figures are made following instructions from Sally Mavor’s new book Felt Wee Folk – New Adventures.

This charming new class is taught by Kitrina, who also teaches Hand Embroidery Basics. She will take you through the construction of these dolls: making the bodies, embroidering the clothing, creating their faces, and adding hair. She will also share some of her own tips and tricks for constructing dolls with ease.

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Taking place the first two Saturdays of December (12/5 and 12/12, 10:00am – 12:30pm), Fanciful Felt Fairy Ornaments is great for adults of all skill levels. The class fee is $75, which includes a copy of the book and supplies to make three fairy ornaments.

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Perfect to make for your own holiday decor or to give as gifts, these ornaments are full of sparkle and charm!

If you are interested in signing up for this class, give us a call at the shop (206-282-9112)! Additional class details can be found on our website.

Easy, elegant infinity scarf tutorial

It is hard to believe that there are only eight weeks left in 2015! In preparation of the holidays, we have planned several great tutorials for quick gifts and holiday cheer.

Today, we’re kicking off the how-to series with a fast and fun project that is perfect as a gift or as an addition to one’s own wardrobe!

Now that autumn is truly underway in Seattle, we are starting to break out our cold-weather accessories. One of our favorites is the easy-to-wear infinity scarf. And did you know? They are incredibly simple and quick to make!

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Whether you are in the market for a scarf that is super casual or perfectly elegant, this pattern is a great place to start. This pattern looks awesome in novelty knits, cozy in flannel, fabulous in faux fur, and magnificent in velvet!

This project takes about 30 minutes to complete and the finished product is so satisfying!


  • Fabric*
    • One or two 2/3 yard cuts of 44” wide fabric
    • One 2/3 yard cut of 60” wide fabric
  • Thread to match

*If you are making your scarf with 60” wide fabric, it will comfortably loop twice. If you use one length of 44″ wide fabric your scarf will not wrap, but if your scarf is made with two lengths of 44” wide fabric your scarf will loop three times! If you use two lengths of 44” wide fabric, consider using two different colors, prints, or even fabric qualities for additional appeal. I think combining burnout velvet and silk charmeuse in coordinating colors would be amazing.


  • Sewing machine
  • Iron
  • Needle for hand sewing


1. If using two 24″ lengths of 44” wide fabric: layer the two pieces right sides together, sew together along one 24” edge using a ½” seam allowance. Press seam open.

No preparation is needed if using a single length of fabric.

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For this tutorial, I selected a cool, 60″ wide novelty knit: two-color french terry with holes in varying sizes. Though the ‘right side’ of this quality is the darker side, I oped to use the terry-loop side as the face.

2. Fold fabric lengthwise, right sides together. Mark 4” in from both ends.

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Stitch between two marks using a ½” seam allowance. Iron seam.

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3. Turn the tube right side out.

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Matching right sides together, stitch across the short ends. Press seam open.

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**Optional** If you like the look of a Möbius scarf, add a twist or two to the length of the scarf before stitching the short ends together. This looks especially nice if using a single length of 44” wide fabric.

4. Hand stitch the remaining opening closed and turn the seam to the inside of the scarf.

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5. Your scarf is complete! Put it on and get cozy!

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Get to know a Nancy’s employee: Susan

Today’s “get to know” interviewee might be best known as the ‘Ribbon Lady’. An accomplished historical costumer, she inspires everyone around her to fall in love with vintage textiles and trims and to appreciate the stories they carry. Please welcome Susan.

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Who are you?
My name is Susan, though I also answer to ‘Ribbon Lady’.

How long have you worked at Nancy’s?
I think it’s been 18 years.

How long have you been sewing?
Since I was a very small child. As a toddler, I started with a yarn needle (my mother would thread it for me) and I would sit and sew for hours. I can hardly remember a time when I didn’t sew.

Do you have a special focus?
Handwork and historical costuming, though to me they are one and the same. I’m interested in basically all costuming eras aside from the 1840s, 1850s, and 1860s. My favorite costumes to create are from the 18th century and Edwardian eras, as both are suited to lots of handwork. Where 18th century styles have fairly simple construction, Edwardian construction is a bit more challenging, which I enjoy.

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The design and color palette for this c.1755 style gown was inspired by the small piece of antique fly fringe at the top of the stomacher.

My costuming process begins with my collection of textiles and trims. It is a slow process; I collect items and create kits of fabric and trims. I use mostly antique and vintage trims, as antique yardage is more difficult to find and more fragile. The starting point for a given costume is usually a single item, like a button or a trim; sometimes it is a tiny piece of 18th century fly fringe, sometimes it is a piece of fabric from the 1920s.

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A black-and-cream checkerboard fabric from the 1920s and vintage cherry motifs inspired this 18th century costume with harlequin details.

What was your first sewing project?
The first true project was sewing doll clothes. I had very well dressed dolls, in many eras of historical costume. Sewing and historical costume go hand-in-hand for me; the clothing of other eras has always been of more interest to me than the clothing I could see on the street.

What is your most recently completed project?
An Edwardian ball gown skirt, made in silk brocade with antique butterflies and antique Art Nouveau trim. The silk brocade is a very deep navy blue, the butterflies are black backed in gold metallic fabric with a slight pleat; it is a moody and mysterious color palette. I’m still working on the bodice that goes with it.

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One of Susan’s completed Edwardian ball gowns, a true 1901 shape. Her recently completed skirt and soon-to-be finished bodice have a similar silhouette.

Do you have a most memorable or favorite project?
The most memorable project would be my daughter’s wedding dress. When I started making it, I believed I had six months to complete it. Then she was awarded an overseas scholarship that had to be used immediately, so the wedding was moved up five months. I completed it in three and a half weeks.

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The bride, Susan’s daughter, and her groom on their wedding day.

It is an 18th century style gown made in a color palette best described as ‘triple cream French vanilla’. The dress is vanilla-colored silk dupioni, with monochromatic embellishment, including embroidery, ribbon embroidery, beading, and dimensional ribbonwork. Most of this dress was made with modern materials, but I did use a gorgeous antique woven tubular silk ribbon. Though the tube is flattened, it still has a lovely dimensionality.

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My favorite project is one of the two things that I made without a deadline: an 18th century ensemble.The skirt was made of cream-colored wool challis, which I embroidered using antique thread. Some of the embroidery – a double wave of pearls winding around the skirt – was inspired by something I saw on an 18th century skirt. The floral motifs were informed by the availability of colors in the antique thread. My mother was a florist and I spent lots of time in her shop when I was young; I used my memories of different flowers to create the motifs, which include lilies of the valley, pansies, forget-me-nots, sweet peas, tiger lilies, anemones, and morning glories. Because I didn’t have a deadline, I was able to spend time experimenting with the flowers. It was lovely.

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Susan in her favorite 18th century ensemble

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To coordinate, I made a Pierrot jacket using an incredible antique 18th century silk fabric in brown with a woven stripe. I trimmed the jacket with white silk organza ruffles, two 18th century metallic trims (one ruffled, the other serpentine), and ribbon and thread buttons from the Victorian era. It wasn’t the most ornate or structurally complex costume I have made, but I felt totally at home in it and it remains a favorite.

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What project is next?
At present, I am preparing for an exhibition of my costumes, which will take place November 11th through 15th at the Glenn Hughes Penthouse Theater at the University of Washington. The show will feature more than 50 costumes, ranging in date from the late 17th century (Cavalier era) through the 1920s.

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In terms of costume, I have several works in progress: an embroidered 1920s coat and the bodice to the Edwardian ball gown skirt, among others. I plan to finish the Edwardian bodice next.

What do you love most about Nancy’s?
The quality of the staff and the quality of the merchandise. And the Ribbon Room, of course! The Ribbon Room and I were made for each other.

Thank you Susan! We are all so excited to see your costumes on display in November. To learn more about Susan’s exhibit, including glimpses into her incredible historical wardrobe, please go to the event website: Art of the Costume.

All photographs in this post courtesy of Nancy’s employee Susan and may not be used without express permission.

Meet a friend of Nancy’s: Janet from Decades of Style

With Halloween around the corner, we are spending a lot of time thinking about costumes. There are so many ways to do costumes, from fanciful and fantastic to historic, and we love them all!

In preparation for this exciting holiday, we decided it would be fun to interview a friend of Nancy’s whose work is great for daily wear and costuming alike! She is a whiz with vintage patterns – and makes it easy for the rest of us to work with them, too.

Without further ado, we present Janet from Decades of Style Pattern Company.NSB - meet Janet headerWho are you?
I’m Janet, from Decades of Style Pattern Company. My official title, according to my business card, is ‘Person’.

What is your business?
We make vintage sewing pattern reproductions for the modern sewer, offering patterns from the 1920s through the 1950s, with a couple styles from the decades before and after.

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We do a lot of the ‘heavy lifting’ associated with sewing from vintage patterns. We translate vintage yardage requirements to work with modern fabric widths. We also grade all our pattern styles to fit nine different sizes (from a 30” bust up to 46”). Decades patterns are also friendlier to work with than actual vintage patterns and they are available in sizes that are reasonable! So many vintage patterns are only available in that mystifying 30” or 32” bust size. I had outgrown that size by the age of 13! We make vintage styles available for the 99% of the population that is larger than a size 0. That’s actually the mission statement of the company.

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Actual vintage patterns from Janet’s collection. Lots of 30″ and 32″ bust sizes.

How did you get started?
I can’t remember a time when I wasn’t interested in antique or vintage clothing. It is a lifelong interest that has turned into a life. Even though I was interested in wearing vintage clothes when I was younger, I didn’t really have any access to purchasing them. Apart from a few 1950s suits that were castoffs from my fancy grandmother’s closet, I didn’t get to wear actual vintage clothing until I left home and could shop in vintage clothing stores. It was a brutal awakening to see that only a tiny fraction of the inventory would fit me.

I realized if I wanted to wear vintage style clothing, I would have to make it myself. Annoyingly enough, most vintage clothing patterns that have survived the last 50-plus years are only available in ridiculously tiny sizes. In order to make those styles for myself, I had to grade the patterns and I knew I could not be the only one who wanted them. Decades of Style is an extension of the grading process.

How long have you been acquainted with Nancy’s?
Nancy’s has carried Decades of Style patterns since 2012. It seems like the pattern line is a very good match for the store.  It’s an honor to be a part of Nancy’s and I’ve really enjoyed getting to know the ladies there.

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Decades of Style patterns on display in Nancy’s.

What is your most recently released product or completed project?
In the summer of 2014, we launched a micro-line of patterns called Decades Everyday. The aesthetic of these patterns lean toward 1960s styling but they still feel modern. The patterns are designed for those who are newer to sewing, though the patterns are great for more skilled sewists who just want a quick make. They are easy to sew and you can pretty much make them in a day. We released our second pattern – the ‘Given a Chance’ dress – in May 2015 and are now working on the next pattern for this line.

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Do you have a most memorable or favorite project?
This question is practically impossible to answer! If I must have a favorite pattern, I would say the E.S.P. Dress from Decades Everyday. Even though I totally adore the more elaborate patterns in our catalog, I cannot deny the appeal and relatively instant gratification of whipping up a pretty dress in an afternoon. And really, depending on the fabric you use, the result can be quite sophisticated.

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This E.S.P. was made with a lovely embroidered border linen.

I probably have more E.S.P. dresses in my wardrobe than any other pattern in the catalog, so it must be my favorite! And if I’m being completely honest, I have quite a few pieces of fabric lined up with this pattern in mind.

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Another E.S.P. dress made in a unique fabric! This time, an ikat is fussy cute to meet in the center front and center back of the bodice. Rickrack at the hemline is a particularly charming touch.

I also love this pattern because I think it is an accessible project for a greater number of sewists out there. There are so many people who have only started to sew in the last few years. It is important for us to keep them in mind as much as the more advanced sewers.

What is next?
PDF patterns. Yup; it’s happening. We just decided it was time to join the 21st century on this one so we’ve been developing this project all year. We’ll keep you posted via Instagram and Facebook on when that launches. It should be coming up very soon.

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Thanks so much, Janet! We are very excited about your venture into PDF patterns and can’t wait for the next Decades Everyday pattern!

For more glimpses into the world of vintage pattern making, including completed customer projects and in-progress photos, follow Decades of Style on Facebook and Instagram!

All photographs in this post are courtesy of Decades of Style and may not be used without express permission.

A new fall wardrobe for boys

If you have been to the store in the past few months, you may have seen the sweet collection of girls’ clothes hanging in our window. As summer turned into autumn, we decided it would be great to make a new kids’ wardrobe, this time for a little boy.

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Full fall wardrobe sewn by Tamara. Sock monkey and sock dog sewn by Kitrina.

We have loved Japanese pattern books, like Pattern Magic and Drape Drape, for many years. This year we received a large selection of new titles that are all equally fascinating and charming, including She Wears the Pants, Basic Black, Stylish Dress Book, and Casual Sweet Clothes. We also got in a handful of the pattern books that focus on children’s wear. The girls’ clothing in our last window was created using patterns from the book Sew Sweet Handmade Clothes for Girls. For our boys’ wardrobe, we used patterns from two books: Stitch Wear Play and Happy Homemade: Sew Chic Kids, and a tee-shirt pattern from KwikSew.

From Stitch Wear Play, we selected the unisex jacket and boy’s shorts patterns (though we lengthened the boy’s shorts into a full pant). From Happy Homemade: Sew Chic Kids, we chose the patterns for wide-leg pants, pull-over parka, and boy’s shirt. The tee-shirt pattern we selected is KwikSew 133.

Once we had the patterns picked out, we started pulling fabrics that would be appropriate for a little boy: comfortable, durable, and fun! At first, we pulled all the fabrics we thought fit the concept, then we narrowed by color and pattern. We came up with a great collection of fabrics that includes flannel, corduroy, canvas, and French terry.

For the jacket, we landed on two-color twill weave in warm gray and black, to be lined with a red & gold plaid Mammoth Flannel from Robert Kaufman. While Stitch Wear Play recommends a cotton jersey for this jacket and leaves it unlined, we wanted to make this a cozy fall jacket, so we simply created a lining from the flannel using the body pieces. For the button closure, we selected a metal button style that is painted to look rusted, which makes this feel like a bit like a barn jacket.

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For the Stitch Wear Play pants, we used lovely fine-wale corduroy in a golden color. As mentioned above, this pattern is drafted as shorts; we lengthened the leg into a full pant. The pattern features a drawstring waist and a yoke that is cut on the bias, giving it a very relaxed silhouette.

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For the pull-over parka, we selected another cozy Mammoth Flannel, this time a small blue/grey gingham motif and used cotton twill tape for the drawstring.

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We made two versions of the wide-leg pants pattern from Happy Homemade: Sew Chic Kids. For one pair, we used a casual cotton/spandex quality in blue-grey featuring both herringbone and double pinstripe details. This pattern features patch pockets on the back, which are too cute.

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For the second pair, we used a lighter-weight cotton canvas in cement grey. We altered the pattern to add pockets to the front and faux fly details. Because this is a pull-on style with elastic waistband, we made the waist casing in cotton broadcloth for a softer, more comfortable alterative to the canvas. Our fabric choice for the waist casing is a cute sloth print from Cotton + Steel.

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For the boy’s button-down shirt, we used cotton broadcloth in a great new arrow print. The fabric has a muted blue ground and arrows in yellow, chartreuse, grey, and tan. For the buttons, we picked out the same rusty looking painted buttons as used for the jacket, which pick up some of the colors in the print.

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We also made two versions of the KwikSew tee pattern. For both versions, we used a super soft French terry quality, made of rayon from bamboo, cotton, and spandex. We carry the fabric in a bunch of great colors, so to coordinate with our other fabric choices, we selected red, blue, and citrus green.

For one tee shirt, we used the red french terry and appliquéd a band of sloths, wrapping from the front to back on the left side.

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We made the second tee in the blue and citrus green colors and made a few cool adjustments to the pattern. The first change was to splice the front and back to create color blocking (an effect that was continued on the cuffs and neck band). The second adjustment was to shorten the neck band. The final change was adding a sloth to the back of the tee, peeking out at the hemline.

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Each of these patterns was fun and easy to construct. In fact, the lengthiest part of making this wardrobe was tracing off all the patterns!

Any questions about the books, patterns, or fabrics we used? Leave them in the comments section below!

Inspired – Nancy’s takes on the runway!

Our anniversary sale has come to an end, but I am excited to share with you all of the runway-inspired looks that were created by Nancy’s talented staff.

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Every year, the staff is given opportunity to make model garments to display during the anniversary sale. In past years, we have followed different themes: one year, everyone used the same jacket pattern and altered it to create completely different looks; another year, everyone made a frock. For the last few years, we have been inspired by the amazing fashions that walk down the runway – and attempted to recreate looks for fractions of their retail prices!

This year, the designers that inspired us are Bottega Veneta, Dolce & Gabbana, Dries Van Noten, Marc Jacobs, The Row, and Tibi. Let’s take a look at the original inspirations, talk about the fabrics and patterns used to create our own looks, and see the finished garments!

Marilyn was inspired by this Dries Van Noten jacket, shown here styled by Barneys New York.

To create her version of this jacket, Marilyn started with KwikSew 3764, which is the pattern used in the Motorcycle Jacket class taught by Jacque Goldsmith. She altered the pattern to add length, make the collar bigger, and create a two-piece sleeve.

For fabric, Marilyn used a 100% polyester jacquard for the body and African Mongolian faux fur for the collar. She underlined the jacquard with 100% cotton flannel and lined the jacket using a warm back winter lining.

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The original Dries Van Noten jacket retails for $1,745. Marilyn made hers for $103!

Jeannie wanted to make a ‘tribute’ dress based on Dolce & Gabbana’s “Viva la Mamma!” collection.

She used McCalls 5927, a now out-of-print pattern, which features a fitted bodice and skirt with pleat detail, similar to the silhouettes shown on the D&G runway.

Jeannie selected a silk & wool blend suiting in a subtle brown/grey plaid for the dress and fully lined it with rayon Bemberg lining.

To really pay tribute to “Viva la Mamma!” Jeannie embroidered a rose motif on the front of her dress. After sketching out a rose design, she drew it directly on her fabric using a metallic pen. She then embroidered over the design, embellishing it with copper colored sequins and iridescent blue beads.

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The Dolce & Gabbana dress shown above retails for $6,995. Jeannie’s version cost just $75!

Chris loved this jacket by The Row, with its cropped sleeve, longer body length, narrow lapel in contrast tweed, and one red buttonhole.

Using Burda 6842, Chris was able to capture the essence of the original style. She worked with Jacque Goldsmith to alter the pattern, shortening the sleeve and updating the lapel, ultimately creating a garment that is flattering to her figure.

The original jacket is made of double-faced wool and silk; to achieve a similar look, Chris paired dense felted wool with lighter-weight wool tweed. For the single red buttonhole, she used silk thread.

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The Row jacket retails for $4,090. Chris made her version for $176!

Prompted by the prevalence of the ‘match set’, Ellen was inspired to make her own version of this Tibi ensemble.

For the top, Ellen used Butterick 6134, altering the pattern for a straighter fit. She selected Butterick 6178 for the pant.

Ellen chose lovely wool suiting in slate blue with a pale stone woven motif for her match set. While neither of her selected patterns includes linings, she opted to add them to each garment. She underlined her top and created a regular lining for the pant.

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The original Tibi ensemble retails for $1,300. Ellen’s version was made for $150!

Two of the Nancy’s employees were inspired by the styles with black lace overlays shown at Bottega Veneta.

Izzie liked the idea of a dress with sleeves and was intrigued by the shaping created by the seams of this dress.

To create her version of the look, Izzie made two separate dresses, using two patterns. She used Vogue 8944 for her overdress, altering the shape of the waistline. For the underdress, she used McCalls 7014, adjusting the neckline to better work with the overdress.

She selected printed cotton broadcloth for her underdress and a sheer patterned fabric for the overdress.

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Jessica loved the simplicity of this dress silhouette and the effect of layering a delicate fabric over sporty stripes.

To recreate this look, Jessica used Burda 6914, which features the same rounded silhouette as the runway look. She lengthened the pattern and adjusted for size.

Jessica selected a rayon quality with a reflected digital print for the under layer and opted for a lace with metallic motif for the outer layer. For the trims, she found a piece of geometric black lace. She used the rayon as an underlining, sewing both layers as one. Because the pattern features a pleated detail at the neck, she opted not to add a lace collar per the inspiration.

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These two dresses look pretty great together!

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The Bottega Veneta dress that inspired Izzie’s dress retails for $7,600. Her version cost less than $100 for both dresses!

The dress that inspired Jessica’s version retails for $11,000. Including pattern & thread, her dress cost just $112!

Kitrina’s ensemble was inspired by many elements from the Marc Jacobs collection, including mixes of fabrics, like the use of sheer fabrics combined with opaque, tailored silhouettes, luxurious textures, and beading & sequins. Ultimately, Kitrina chose to make a box-pleat skirt that explores the opaque/sheer concept, a tailored double-breasted jacket, and a blouse with a band of sequins.

For her jacket, Kitrina used McCalls 8346, lengthening the jacket body and letting out the waist slightly. The blouse was made using KwikSew 3601; Kitrina altered the neckline and shortened the tunic body. Kitrina based the skirt on Burda 8155 (this is the pattern used for our Pencil Skirt Secrets class), reworking the shape to allow for the box pleats.

Kitrina selected burnout velvet in a purple/grey wild cat motif for her blouse and black sequined mesh for the band at the hemline. For her skirt, Kitrina used an olive/brown/navy plaid wool suiting for the outer pleat and black mesh with metallic dot for the inner pleat. Her jacket was made from a wool suiting – navy  pinstriped in brown – using black mohair for the contrast collar and faux pocket flaps.

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A similar ensemble from Marc Jacobs retails at $7,500. Kitrina was able to make her version for about $493!

I hope you enjoyed this look at our runway-inspired garments! Have questions about any of the looks? Leave them in the comments below!

Interview with a store department: the Ribbon Room

Today we get to know a favorite space in the store – the Ribbon Room!

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Who are you?
Hello, I’m the Ribbon Room!

Where do you reside at Nancy’s?
I have a cozy little room in the back right-hand corner of the store. Because I have my own room, some people miss me on their first (or second!) visit to the shop.NSB - RR df satin and petersham

Do you have a special focus?
Yes! I am home to the exquisite ribbons and trims carried at Nancy’s, in addition to millinery supplies like flowers and veiling, specialty buttons, and fun little gifts. For ribbons, there are lots of great basics – like rayon Petersham grosgrain, double-face satin in both silk and polyester, and sheer polyester organdy ribbons – but we also have an incredible selection of vintage ribbons, heirloom laces, and trims.

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The ‘dessert’ case holds some of our most beautiful and expensive ribbons and trims. Many are vintage, some are reproductions, all are truly exquisite.

As Susan, the ‘ribbon lady’, puts it: the Ribbon Room is where we keep the dessert.

What is your most recently received product?
We just got a large shipment of lovely millinery flowers, including some fun little toadstools! We also received a fun selection of vintage flowers.

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Do you have a current favorite product?
A few months back we got a huge selection of vintage ribbons, including exquisite taffeta and lustrous satin in a rainbow of interesting colors.

NSB - RR vintage satin and taffeta

Among the vintage options was this fabulous double face ribbon: velvet on one side, satin on the other. It is a silk and cotton blend, with the most luxurious hand. The color, called Hula Brown, is very beautiful, but what makes it interesting is the satin and velvet sides are different hues, like dark and milk chocolate.

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Plus, the packaging on the vintage options is incredibly charming!

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Check out this label!

Any favorite projects you’ve seen made from your wares?
Goodness, this is difficult to answer. Like the woolens department, we have sold so much ribbon, veiling, and trims throughout the years that this answer could be a mile long.

There are a lot of projects that are fun, but not necessarily unique. We work with lots of brides who are looking for ribbons to trim their invitations and programs, to make a veil, or who simply want a colorful sash. We are lucky to carry the embroidered trims, laces, and insertions that go into heirloom sewing, so we get to help people making christening gowns. We also sell ribbon for things as simple as hair-bows and gifts, which are delightful.

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Beyond that, some highlights do spring to mind: Every time Candace Kling comes to teach a class at Nancy’s, we get to see our wares turn into incredible work: striped grosgrains become cockades, wired ribbon and stamens blossom into flowers, and much more.

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Working with antique doll collectors and miniaturists is always fun and surprising. It is also incredibly enjoyable to help people find the perfect trimmings for costumes, whether historical, for a local theater production, or for a kid’s Halloween costume!

Thank you, Ribbon Room! It is always fun to see your treasures!

From now until the end of the Nancy’s anniversary sale, the Ribbon Room will be featured for daily specials on Tuesday, Sept 15th (15% off flowers), Wednesday, Sept 16th & Friday, Sept 18th (15% off buttons), and Sunday, Sept 20th (15% off ribbons)!

All pictures in this post copyright of Nancy’s Sewing Basket, LLC. Special thanks to Kam Martin for her photography skills.