Category Archives: patterns

HeartFelt Valentines

Valentine’s Day is just around the corner! How are you planning to show a little love this year?

Inspired by our 2016 intention, I decided it would be fun to make valentines that last! Enter our “heart felt” valentines!

NSB - heartfelt valentines header

These handmade valentines are a sweet and unexpected way to show your loved ones how much you care.

I took inspiration from some of my favorite Valentine’s Day memories and came up with three fun styles for these valentines. The first is inspired by classic conversation hearts.

NSB – heartfelt convo hearts

The second style is inspired by the valentines I made as a child using paper doilies & construction paper.

NSB – heartfelt doily valentine

The third style has extra dimension and makes a great ornament, perfect for giving and decorating!

NSB – heartfelt ornament

Aren’t they sweet? I can’t wait to deliver them to all my favorite people!


Ready to make some heart felt valentines of your own? These valentines require very few supplies and are simple enough that they could be a fun project to make with children!

SUPPLIES

For all versions:

  • Download our heart templates here: NSB heart felt valentines pattern sheet
    • I recommend printing on cardstock to make a sturdy template. I find it easiest and most accurate to trace the template directly onto the felt, rather than pinning a paper pattern and cutting around.
  • Felt in any colors you prefer (I recommend a wool blend felt, though synthetic craft felt is fine).
    • My color palette was inspired by classic conversation hearts (pale pink, yellow, light blue, green, white, purple) and I added a few, more saturated colors for accents (red, magenta, hot pink, light grey).
  • Embroidery floss in colors that match your felt and also contrast it.

 

For conversation hearts:

  • Fiberfill (a 12 oz. bag will yield many hearts!)

For ornament style:

  • Thread to match felt for larger hearts (optional)
  • Short piece of ribbon (~3”; optional)

TOOLS

  • Needle for hand embroidery
  • Scissors
  • Removable ink pen (I recommend water-erasable)

For doily style:

  • Pinking shears or scallop edge scissors (optional)

For ornament style:

  • Sewing machine (optional)

DIRECTIONS

Conversation Hearts

  1. Using our template (NSB heart felt valentines pattern sheet), cut two hearts out of felt. On one heart, write out your message using the removable ink pen. Use a favorite saying or make up something special!NSB - heartfelt ch prepare pieces
  1. Using red embroidery floss, embroider your message. I recommend using two strands of floss and a backstitch. Use more floss for a bolder look.NSB - heartfelt ch embroider message
    When complete, rinse out ink, if applicable.NSB - heartfelt ch rinse markings
  2. Place two hearts together, with message side out. Using embroidery floss that matches the felt, blanket stitch around ¾ of the heart. NSB - heartfelt ch blanket stitch together 3-4
    I recommend starting in the dip at the top and stitching around one side down to the bottom point. Then, starting in the same place at the top, stitch around the heart bump on the other side and leaving a space of about 1.5” open for stuffing. Do NOT cut your floss at this stage, as it will be used to sew the opening closed.
  3. Pull a small handful of fiberfill from the bag.NSB - heartfelt ch poly fill
    Stuff the heart with fiberfill. I recommend starting with the bump on the partially sewn size, then stuffing the second bump, then the full body of the heart.NSB - heartfelt ch stuff heart
  4. When heart is fully stuffed, pin the opening, and sew closed with blanket stitch.NSB - heartfelt ch pin opening closed
  5. You are now ready to start a conversation with your sweetheart!NSB - heartfelt ch finish blanket stitching
  6. Want to make these a bit faster or more simply? These look just as adorable as solid colors! Just cut out a few hearts in each of the felt colors and then pair them at random.

    Use floss in one of the two colors (or a different color altogether) to create your blanket stitch, providing a little visual interest.

    These two-hue hearts look great on their own or mixed in with the conversation hearts!NSB - heartfelt ch convo and two color hearts


 

Doily Valentine

  1. Using our templates (NSB heart felt valentines pattern sheet), cut one large heart and one small heart in two different colors.NSB – heartfelt doily cut large small hearts
  2. With your scissors, cut freeform scallops around the edge of the large heart. I recommend starting with a single scallop at the center bottom and moving up both sides.

    You can save a little time by using pinking shears or other decorative scallop scissors.NSB – heartfelt doily pinked edges

  3. It’s time to embroider your smaller heart! Consider a simple valentine’s phrase like “love” or “be mine”, or plan to embroider a sweet motif like flowers or hearts. Not sure what to embroider? It may be helpful to trace the small heart onto paper to sketch out different styles.NSB – heartfelt doily sketch
    Using your removable ink pen, plot your decoration on the smaller heart and embroider! I like to use flosses in colors that match the large heart for a cohesive look.NSB – heartfelt doily embroidered small heart
    When complete, rinse out the ink, if applicable.
  4. Layer the two hearts, right sides up, centering the smaller. Using a running stitch, sew the small heart to the large.NSB – heartfelt doily stitch together
  5. If desired, embroider a small motif in each of the scallops, using a color to match the small heart. This is a fun way to mimic or compliment your embroidered motifs in the small heart.NSB – heartfelt doily embroider scallops
    On the back, there will be two visible sets of stitches.NSB – heartfelt doily finished back
  6. Voila! NSB – heartfelt doily finished

 

3-D Valentine Ornament

  1. Using our templates (NSB heart felt valentines pattern sheet), cut two large hearts from one color of felt and four small hearts from another.NSB – heartfelt ornament cut hearts
  2. Using a sewing machine and thread, or a hand sewing needle with thread or floss, stitch the two large hearts together from center top to center bottom. This will create a total of four ‘arms’ that make up four large hearts.NSB – heartfelt ornament sew large hearts together
    Open between the two layers on each side and fold hearts on seamline.NSB – heartfelt ornament fold on seam
  3. Center one small heart over one of the larger hearts, aligning the bottom point and top dip of the small heart to the seam- or fold-line of the larger heart. Pin the layers together on one side (I like to pin the left side first). Turning the ‘arm’ so your unpinned side is facing away, center a second small heart over the larger heart that now faces up. Pin one side of the new small heart to the large heart, catching the unpinned side of the previous small heart.NSB – heartfelt ornament pin small hearts
    Repeat for all small hearts.
  4. Using a hand needle and embroidery floss that matches the larger hearts, begin sewing through three layers with a running stitch, working from the center top to the bottom around one side of the heart.
    Repeat for all four ‘arms’. You will have four stitched small hearts.NSB – heartfelt ornament repeat for all
  5. If you like, repeating the process of step 4, add an second row of stitches to the inside. Use a different shade of floss for visual interest.NSB – heartfelt ornament second color
    Repeat a third time, with another shade of floss, if you prefer.
  6. Your 3-D valentine is complete! If you want to make it into an ornament, sew a small loop of ribbon to the top center. Otherwise, hand it to someone you love!NSB – heartfelt ornament final

I hope you have enjoyed this tutorial! If hand embroidery is not your thing, consider using puff paint, glitter, sequins, buttons, or even printed fabric to help embellish your valentines!

Have a question or feedback? Please leave it in the comments below!

Quick and easy tote tutorial

This tote pattern was inspired by the best bag I ever had: big enough to carry a small selection of groceries or a creative project, but small enough that it never felt cumbersome. To expand on that bag’s great shape, I created three different sizes, each perfectly useful in its own right.

NSB - quick and easy tote tutorial header

The simplicity of this tote design provides so much opportunity to exercise creativity! Choose a fun printed fabric and embellish it with embroidery. Create some graphic patchwork and quilt it for additional texture. Paint your own fabric to be used for the outside. Make it in leather for a chic look.

This pattern goes together so quickly, I doubt you will want to make just one!

SUPPLIES

For all sizes, you will need:

  • Fashion fabric (I used printed cotton)
  • Lining fabric (I used printed cotton)
  • Webbing or ribbon for handles
  • Thread
  • Fusible fleece (optional; this adds body to the bag and stabilizes fabric)

TOOLS

  • Rotary cutter (recommended) or scissors
  • Quilter’s style see through ruler (I use 6.5” x 24”)
  • Self-healing mat (if using rotary cutter)
  • Marking tool (pen, pencil and chalk are all fine)
  • Sewing machine
  • Iron
  • Hand sewing needle (optional)

DIMENSIONS

quick and easy tote dimensions chart

Finished tote sizes:

  • The small tote finishes approximately 9.5” tall x 8.25” wide x 3.25” deep
  • The medium tote finishes approximately 12.25” t x 10.25” w x 4.25” d
  • The large tote finishes approximately 14.75” t x 12” w x 5.25” d

DIRECTIONS

For this tutorial, we show the construction of a medium tote. All seam allowances are 3/8”.

1. Cut fashion and lining fabrics to size. If using fusible fleece, follow manufacturer’s instructions to fuse to back of fashion fabric.NSB - quick and easy tote cut fabrics to size

2. For each piece of fashion fabric, find center point of top edge. Measure and mark the distance from center point according to dimensions chart (e.g. for medium tote, measure and mark 3” to either side for a total spacing of 6”).NSB - quick and easy tote mark center and strap spacing

Next, take one strap and align raw edge of webbing to raw edge of fabric along the top, matching to the  outside of the spacing mark.NSB - quick and easy tote align strap 1

Repeat with other end of strap and second spacing mark.NSB - quick and easy tote align strap 2

On sewing machine, baste straps in place (I like to sew 1/4” from the edge).NSB - quick and easy tote baste strap

3. Pin and sew one lining piece to fashion fabric along top edge using 3/8” seam allowance. NSB - quick and easy tote pin lining to outside

Repeat for second fashion fabric and lining pieces.NSB - quick and easy tote sew lining and outer pieces

Iron to set seam, then iron lining and fashion sides down (this will help create a clean finish along top edge).

4. Take one side and reopen; lay wrong side down. NSB - quick and easy tote lay wrong side down

Open second side and lay atop the first, right sides together, matching fashion fabrics and aligning the seams at edges.NSB - quick and easy tote pin tote pieces right sides together

Sew the two side seams and the bottom seam for the fashion fabric. On the bottom edge for the lining, leave a 4” to 5” opening in the center. **NOTE: it is best not to  backstitch at the corners, as these will be pressed open and cut off**NSB - quick and easy tote sew all sides leaving an opening at bottom of lining

Press flat.

5. Create the box bottom: in one corner, pull the two fabric pieces away from each other so the two seams match; press seams open. Using the ruler, measure and mark the length shown on the dimensions chart perpendicular to the seam line (e.g. for the medium tote, measure 4” from fold to fold). I find a quilting ruler marked with 45° angle to be particularly helpful to this task, as I can align with the folded edge. NSB - quick and easy tote mark box bottom outer fabricNSB - quick and easy tote mark box bottom lining

Sew on machine; be certain to backstitch at the edges. NSB - quick and easy tote sew box bottom

Trim seam allowance to 3/8”.

Repeat for all four corners. Press to set seams.

6. Turn the bag right side out through opening in bottom of lining.

Edge stitch the opening closed on the machine or blind stitch closed by hand.

NSB - quick and easy tote stitch opening closed

Fit the lining into the tote body, matching the box corners.

7. Iron the top edge (this is where that ironing in step 3 comes in handy). Pin in place, if desired.NSB - quick and easy tote iron top edge

Stitch around top 1/8” from edge; stitch again 1/4″ from edge.

8. Admire your new bag!


As mentioned above, there are many ways to personalize this tote!

In one version, I added a pocket to the lining…

…which would also work very well on the outside!NSB - reusable gift wrap large tote pocket outside

For another version, I used a printed fabric and a coordinating near solid for the lining. I added embroidery to the printed fabric and made a matching appliqué for the near solid. By finishing the ‘lining’ by hand, this becomes a reversible bag!

I hope you enjoy making your own version of this tote! If you have any questions, please leave them in the comments below!

Using fabric as gift wrap

After making my advent calendar, I became excited by the idea of starting another new tradition in my household: reusable gift wrap. Just thinking about the amount of torn wrapping paper that goes to recycling after opening holiday presents is enough to make me feel faint, so I thought: why not wrap gifts in something that is easily reused?

The solution? Fabric!

NSB - reusable gift wrap header

Wouldn’t it be so fun to find this stack of gifts beneath the tree?

Whether using a cut of fabric to wrap a gift or sewing it into a bag that can double as a fun holiday tote, there are many fun approaches to wrapping gifts in fabric. Let’s take a look at a few of them.


 

Earlier this year, we shared a tutorial for our easy gift bag pattern. This bag is quick-to-make and perfectly fits a wine bottle. It looks great made in a variety of fabrics, from novelty print cotton to a shimmery organza. Tailor it to the recipient or the specific bottle you are giving!

NSB - reusable gift wrap easy gift bag


 

Nancy’s carries the excellent book Wrapping with Fabric by Etsuko Yamada, which explores traditional ways of using furoshiki. Totally inspired, I decided to try a couple basic wrap styles using fabric in fun prints.

 

NSB - reusable gift wrap with fabric and book

These were wrapped in rayon challis (left) and cotton broadcloth (back right). Both prints are festive, but neither is specifically “holiday”, so they can easily be reused for other occasions.

 

While a traditional furoshiki has two selvedges and two hemmed edges, I decided to serge around the four edges of my fabric for minimal sewing. This would be a lovely way to wrap a present for someone who sews, as the wrapping fabric can double as a gift!

NSB - reusable gift wrap fabric

Can you guess what’s inside? The green parcel has a pair of books and the red gift is a sewing basket! I purchase 3/4 yard of each fabric to create my version of the furoshiki.


 

Our free grocery bag pattern (NSB grocery bag instructions) also makes a great gift bag. The shape is especially great for larger and bulkier items!

NSB - reusable gift wrap grocery bag pattern

I left off the handles for a clean finish and added ribbon for festive flair. The fabric I selected is actually toweling-by-the-yard, which is the perfect width for this pattern!


 

I love the idea of wrapping a gift inside of a gift (think of it as the turducken of giftwrap). Enter our quick and easy tote in three sizes!

NSB - reusable gift wrap three totes

These bags combine the fun and ease of wrapping in a gift bag with the practicality of a tote bag. I love the notion of filling this bag with a collection of small gifts for a deserving recipient. Make a home spa kit for a beauty enthusiast or tuck a couple books into the tote for your favorite bookworm!

All three sizes of this tote are incredibly useful and appropriate for anyone, young or old.

NSB - reusable gift wrap small tote outside

The small tote is perfect for kids or for reuse as a lunch bag!

NSB - reusable gift wrap medium tote

Our medium tote is the perfect ‘anytime’ size!

NSB - reusable gift wrap large tote outside

The large tote is an excellent size for commuters and students, easily carrying a laptop and a couple books.

Interested in making a quick-and-easy tote of your own? Check back with us tomorrow for a full tutorial!

 

Color-wheel quilt

Hello! Jessica here. Today I am thrilled to share with you a recent quilting project! (You may even remember that I mentioned this quilt in my interview!)

NSB - color-wheel quilt header

Using the pattern from Joelle Hoverson’s book Last-Minute Patchwork + Quilted Gifts, I made a color-wheel quilt featuring Kona cotton solids from Robert Kaufman.

NSB - JH last minute patchwork book cover

The original design uses printed cottons to create beautiful color movement with lots of visual texture.

NSB - JH color-wheel quilt in book

I love the way this looks, but decided I wanted to try it out with solid colors. We carry the Kona cotton line at Nancy’s, offering a decent selection of the 303 colors (!) that Robert Kaufman makes. I planned to make this color-wheel using clear, saturated colors.

Because the color-wheel is comprised of 52 wedges, I set to work choosing all my colors, beginning with some of my favorites hues and filling in where necessary. In the book, Hoverson recommends creating quadrants of 13 colors for ease in planning, which was incredibly helpful. I made a color inventory to keep track of exactly what colors I would use and where I wanted them to sit in the wheel.

NSB - color-wheel quilt color inventory

I wish I’d taken a photo of my selection process, but I actually started by pulling out and lining up the full bolts of Kona, just to ensure I had the best colors. When I couldn’t find exactly the right transition color in stock, I checked against the Kona color card and made a note of what we should order in for the store.

The color inventory came in very handy when it was time to cut my fabrics and again later when I was assembling my quilt top.

NSB - color-wheel stack of fabrics

This pattern was very fun and easy to construct. The recommended quilting (straight quilting radiating from the center, using the color wedges as guides) is fairly simple and has an incredible effect. I used washable wool batting for this quilt, which has a gorgeous loft.

In addition to using solid colors rather than prints, I did one other major thing different from the book: where Hoverson calls for white fabric for the background, binding, and backing, I decided to use a very pale solid grey (Kona color Ash). I opted for this pale neutral largely because it reminds me of the Seattle sky, but also because I wanted the transition from ground to color-wheel to be less stark. I couldn’t be happier with the results.

NSB - color-wheel quilt complete

One thing I love about finishing a quilt and taking photographs is that you really get to see how the fabrics play with one another. I absolutely love that the lightest colors in my color-wheel look like they are shimmering.

This color-wheel quilt was super fun from start to finish. I love the versatility in how it can be made up: altering the fabric palette from prints to solids (or doing a mix of both), selecting a narrow color palette (e.g. using a two hue palette rather than a full rainbow), changing out the background color, and much more. I have had a lot of fun looking at the other color-wheel quilts that have been made using this pattern! Here are a few of my favorites:

Kelly of Purple Workbench made the color-wheel quilt as a wedding gift for her brother and sister-in-law, using their wedding palette as the color guide. Her fabric choices in teal, silver, and lime green are perfection! I also love how she quilted it using concentric circles for the wheel and added their initials and wedding date to the center.

Kristen at All Snug as a Bug changed the color of her background from white to black with awesome results. I love how it changes the effect!

Holly of Stitch Craft made one for her son, limiting her color palette to blues and greens. The effect is really lovely and very chic. She also made a matching curtain using her left-over fabric!

Dani of Knit, Stitch, Click! followed the pattern of the book quite closely, but added borders to make it fit a queen size bed! I love that she quilted the color-wheel as shown in the book, but changed the quilting in the added borders to create a kind of frame.

Tamara Kate, a talented fabric designer, used the pattern to create a modern holiday ‘wreath’ featuring her print lines Festive Forest and Festive Nest. She says it will be hung on a blank wall in her home every holiday season for additional color and warmth! Such a clever idea! I also love how she quilted this, leaving the center open, like a wreath.

Thanks for joining me today! Have a question? Let me know in the comments below!

Rolling down my stockings and rouging my knees – part 4

Welcome back for the final installment of making my 1920s costume! I am very excited to share details about preparing the last part of my ensemble – my shoes – and to reveal my costume in its entirety!

NSB - 1920s costume header pt 4

One of the easiest and most fun components of my roaring twenties costume was the shoes. While the other components of my ensemble – my dress, headpiece, and purse – have a definite ‘costume’ feel to them, I knew I wanted my shoes to still translate into my regular wardrobe. I began researching 1920s evening shoes and found some amazing inspiration!

These incredible shoes have a place to hold a small lipstick on the heel! source

The 1920s were an interesting time for women’s footwear, because hemlines were suddenly short enough that shoes were always visible. As a result, every component of a shoe was fair game for embellishment, including the heel!

After drooling over all the incredible designs, I knew I wanted to add rhinestones to my heels! I searched for the right pair of shoes: something with a modest heel of an appropriate shape (the heel needed to be 2.5” or less and not too conical) and a Mary Jane or T-strap. Luckily for me, vintage-influenced styles are produced every season, so I knew it wouldn’t be impossible to find a good pair of shoes that met these criteria.

I found several pairs of shoes that were really fun, in bright colors like tangerine and citron, or with spectator styling. Unfortunately, these were either too tall or out of my price range, so I kept looking. I’m so glad I did, because I found just the right pair of shoes!

I love the Mary Jane styling with the sweet cut-outs and the solid shape of the heel. source

Once I had the shoes in hand, I planned out a simple-but-effective design for rhinestones on my heels. I began by making a template of my heel using white printer paper.

NSB - 1920s-style heels make a template

I sketched an outline, inspired by the shape of actual twenties heels.

NSB - 1920s-style heels sketch design

From there I created my motif and marked rhinestone placement.

NSB - 1920s-style heels create layout

I made holes in my template using an awl (a very thick needle, like a tapestry needle, would also work for this) and marked where my rhinestones should go using a white colored pencil.

NSB - 1920s-style heels rhinestone template

Then, I applied the rhinestones to one of the heels…

NSB - 1920s-style heels one shoe done

…and repeated on the second! I totally love how they turned out!

NSB - 1920s-style heels finished

Now that that’s out of the way, let’s move on the final reveal!

NSB - jessica's hazel's frock

I feel like this costume really needs a sound track! Let’s enjoy the Charleston!

NSB - jessica's hazel's frock side

“Charleston! Charleston!”

NSB - jessica's hazel's frock back

I love the view from the back, showing off the jaunty neck scarf and flashing my new heels.

Thanks so much for joining me through this whole process! It was incredibly fun to dream up and make this costume, and even better to share it!

If you have any feedback, questions, or ideas for what you’d like to see in the future, let me know in the comments below!

Rolling down my stockings and rouging my knees – part 1

Jessica here! Welcome to our newest multi-post series, where I talk all about creating a 1920s costume and accessories. I am excited to share with you all the details and planning that went into making a fabulous ensemble for my friend’s Roaring ‘20s themed birthday bash! NSB - 1920s costume header pt 1 As a plus size woman, I knew that it might be difficult to find a 1920s costume off the rack. Because I love costumes and making fun ensembles, I figured I might as well make something fabulous for this party!

Today I will go over pattern and fabric selection and share a lot of the beautiful inspiration I found. The 1920s: such a fabulous era for gorgeous clothing, accessories, and details!

After receiving the party invitation, I started looking at possible patterns. I don’t have the ‘ideal’ twenties figure and I’ve never really worn drop waist silhouettes, so I looked for a style that I would be comfortable in, that could accommodate my full hips and, hopefully, be flattering. I primarily searched the independent historical pattern lines we carry at Nancy’s, Folkwear and Decades of Style, and found some great options.

NSB - Folkwear 1920s patterns

Folkwear patterns, clockwise from top left: #237 Tango Dress, #214 1927 Tea Frock, #264 Monte Carlo Dress, #261 Paris Promenade Dress

NSB - Decades of Style 1920s patterns

Decades of Style patterns, clockwise from top left: #2502 1925 Zig Zag Dress, #2501 1925 Fringe Front Dress, #2003 1920s Hazel’s Frock, #2004 1920s Tier-rific Ensemble

From there, I looked at pattern sizing and styling. Unfortunately, the Folkwear pattern I loved most, the Tango Dress, does not run large enough for me, and I wasn’t as interested in their other silhouettes for this particular occasion. Looking at all the options from Decades of Style, I was most interested in the 1920s Hazel’s Frock and the 1925 Zig Zag Dress. After reviewing the construction details and finished measurements, I landed on (drum roll, please)…

Decades of Style 1920s Hazels Frock

Hazel’s Frock!

Once I knew what I was going to make, I had to select fabrics! This is my favorite part of any sewing project and choosing fabric for this costume was no exception! At this point, I turned to Pinterest for the never-ending visual inspiration it offers. I’m going to share a few of my very favorite 1920s dresses I found there, but know there are so many other incredible examples.

After gathering ideas for materials and colors, I set out looking for my fabrics. I did a quick search through my own stash and found a potential candidate for the main body of the dress. When I couldn’t find a suitable coordinate for the neck and hem scarves, I browsed the special occasion section at Nancy’s and came up with several new, fantastic combinations.

NSB - harlequin print combo

Purple/black/white harlequin print silk chiffon featuring silver & gold lamé with metallic print poly chiffon for the scarves

NSB - art deco print combo

Art Deco print on silk/cotton with silk/metallic organza for the scarves

NSB - chevron raschel knit combo

Black & gold raschel chevron knit with sparkly poly organza for the scarves

NSB - multi color novelty print combo

Multi-colored novelty print silk crêpe-de-chine with three coordinating silks for the scarves

And then I saw it: the perfect fabric. It was vibrant and fun! Sheer and opaque! It sparkled! And best of all: it was already embellished, so most of the work had been done for me! I wouldn’t even have to hem it!

Realizing the addition of scarves around the hemline would detract from the incredible embellishment, I decided I would make only the neck scarf from the original pattern, using a simple black poly organza, similar to the basecloth.

Because I chose a sheer fabric for my dress, I elected to make a coordinating slip to wear under. I used the fabulous Intimacies pattern from Folkwear, which includes a bias cut slip or teddy, tap pants, and camisole, all perfect foundations for 1920s and ‘30s style clothing. For fabric, I selected our rayon/acetate blend satin faille, which has a great hand and works incredibly well on the bias.Folkwear Intimacies pattern cover I had help fitting the dress pattern from our excellent sewing instructor, Jacque Goldsmith. (side note: Did you know Jacque offers 15 minutes of free advice on the first Thursday of every month? It’s perfect for quickly fitting a muslin!) We moved the french dart up about an inch and added fish-eye darts to the back, to help reduce bulk and better fit my shape.

From there, construction of both the dress and slip was straightforward. The majority of my efforts were spent removing sequins and appliqués from seam allowances and the darts and hand sewing them back in after the construction was complete. I am so pleased with how this dress turned out!

NSB - Hazels Frock front

Dress front

NSB - Hazels Frock back

Dress back – I love the elegance and simplicity of the neck scarf. I cleverly hid my back darts under two of the appliqués.

Join me for the next installment as I make a 1920s headpiece to coordinate with my dress! I have a lot more inspiration to share. And stay tuned for the full, final look; it’s the cat’s pyjamas!

Bettie Bomber jacket – weeks two & three

Marilyn is back this week to share more about the Bettie Bomber class! Miss out on the first class? Check it out here.

NSB - Bettie header pt 2 Because we were missing one person, week two was spent helping students alter their patterns and cut out their fabric. I had already cut out my fabric at home on my dining room table, so I worked on marking my fabric, talking over seam finishes and doing my stay stitching. So what are my tips on cutting out your jacket? If you are like me and don’t have a real cutting table, it is worth purchasing some bed risers and lifting your table up to a comfortable height. I like to cut with weights and a 28 mm rotary cutter, but Jacque cuts out with pins and scissors. I have a tiny sewing space and I really appreciate my set of three Olfa mats that clamp together to cover my table. The clamps can get in the way now and then, but I don’t mind because they are so much easier to store than the big mat I had before. I also really appreciate the self-healing quality of the Olfa mats. I don’t know what you call a non-self-healing mat, a tortured mat maybe? Mine old one was so sliced up that it was hard to cut on and it certainly caused me pain. My fabric is a very dark plaid and I tried to match plaids under the arms, and at the shoulders. I think it should match up well, because there are lots of straight seams in this jacket and the only seam with ease is the back sleeve around the elbows. When I am cutting plaid fabric, I cut each piece individually. It also helps to draw on the seam allowances, so that you match the plaid where it will actually join – not on the cut edge. NSB - Bomber2-1 With week three we were back to work. Some students were still getting some pattern alteration advice, but we moved on to discuss garment construction, zippers, snaps and pockets. Jacque showed us how to shorten a zipper and we all gave it a try. There is definitely a knack to cleanly pulling off zipper teeth, so I was glad to have some pointers and practice. NSB - shiny gunmetal zipper I decided not to shorten a zipper myself and instead I am ordering a custom length of our nice zippers from California. For an additional dollar, they will cut the zipper of your choice to the length that you specify. I chose a black zipper with shiny gunmetal teeth and pull. NSB - Bomber2-2 Along with zippers and snaps, we worked on different pockets for the bomber jacket. Jacque gave us a pattern piece for kangaroo pockets and sample kangaroo pockets to finish & apply. We learned to finish the curved top edge of the kangaroo pocket, one method for a turned hem and one for a bound edge. I liked the turned hem technique and it looked great the first time I tried it. It was a bit trickier to use a knit or ribbing to bind the kangaroo pocket’s curved edge – but the nice thing about this style of pocket is that you can try making a few pockets, then apply the pockets that turn out best! NSB - Bomber2-3 Thanks so much Marilyn! Looking forward to the next installment!