Tag Archives: tutorial

HeartFelt Valentines

Valentine’s Day is just around the corner! How are you planning to show a little love this year?

Inspired by our 2016 intention, I decided it would be fun to make valentines that last! Enter our “heart felt” valentines!

NSB - heartfelt valentines header

These handmade valentines are a sweet and unexpected way to show your loved ones how much you care.

I took inspiration from some of my favorite Valentine’s Day memories and came up with three fun styles for these valentines. The first is inspired by classic conversation hearts.

NSB – heartfelt convo hearts

The second style is inspired by the valentines I made as a child using paper doilies & construction paper.

NSB – heartfelt doily valentine

The third style has extra dimension and makes a great ornament, perfect for giving and decorating!

NSB – heartfelt ornament

Aren’t they sweet? I can’t wait to deliver them to all my favorite people!


Ready to make some heart felt valentines of your own? These valentines require very few supplies and are simple enough that they could be a fun project to make with children!

SUPPLIES

For all versions:

  • Download our heart templates here: NSB heart felt valentines pattern sheet
    • I recommend printing on cardstock to make a sturdy template. I find it easiest and most accurate to trace the template directly onto the felt, rather than pinning a paper pattern and cutting around.
  • Felt in any colors you prefer (I recommend a wool blend felt, though synthetic craft felt is fine).
    • My color palette was inspired by classic conversation hearts (pale pink, yellow, light blue, green, white, purple) and I added a few, more saturated colors for accents (red, magenta, hot pink, light grey).
  • Embroidery floss in colors that match your felt and also contrast it.

 

For conversation hearts:

  • Fiberfill (a 12 oz. bag will yield many hearts!)

For ornament style:

  • Thread to match felt for larger hearts (optional)
  • Short piece of ribbon (~3”; optional)

TOOLS

  • Needle for hand embroidery
  • Scissors
  • Removable ink pen (I recommend water-erasable)

For doily style:

  • Pinking shears or scallop edge scissors (optional)

For ornament style:

  • Sewing machine (optional)

DIRECTIONS

Conversation Hearts

  1. Using our template (NSB heart felt valentines pattern sheet), cut two hearts out of felt. On one heart, write out your message using the removable ink pen. Use a favorite saying or make up something special!NSB - heartfelt ch prepare pieces
  1. Using red embroidery floss, embroider your message. I recommend using two strands of floss and a backstitch. Use more floss for a bolder look.NSB - heartfelt ch embroider message
    When complete, rinse out ink, if applicable.NSB - heartfelt ch rinse markings
  2. Place two hearts together, with message side out. Using embroidery floss that matches the felt, blanket stitch around ¾ of the heart. NSB - heartfelt ch blanket stitch together 3-4
    I recommend starting in the dip at the top and stitching around one side down to the bottom point. Then, starting in the same place at the top, stitch around the heart bump on the other side and leaving a space of about 1.5” open for stuffing. Do NOT cut your floss at this stage, as it will be used to sew the opening closed.
  3. Pull a small handful of fiberfill from the bag.NSB - heartfelt ch poly fill
    Stuff the heart with fiberfill. I recommend starting with the bump on the partially sewn size, then stuffing the second bump, then the full body of the heart.NSB - heartfelt ch stuff heart
  4. When heart is fully stuffed, pin the opening, and sew closed with blanket stitch.NSB - heartfelt ch pin opening closed
  5. You are now ready to start a conversation with your sweetheart!NSB - heartfelt ch finish blanket stitching
  6. Want to make these a bit faster or more simply? These look just as adorable as solid colors! Just cut out a few hearts in each of the felt colors and then pair them at random.

    Use floss in one of the two colors (or a different color altogether) to create your blanket stitch, providing a little visual interest.

    These two-hue hearts look great on their own or mixed in with the conversation hearts!NSB - heartfelt ch convo and two color hearts


 

Doily Valentine

  1. Using our templates (NSB heart felt valentines pattern sheet), cut one large heart and one small heart in two different colors.NSB – heartfelt doily cut large small hearts
  2. With your scissors, cut freeform scallops around the edge of the large heart. I recommend starting with a single scallop at the center bottom and moving up both sides.

    You can save a little time by using pinking shears or other decorative scallop scissors.NSB – heartfelt doily pinked edges

  3. It’s time to embroider your smaller heart! Consider a simple valentine’s phrase like “love” or “be mine”, or plan to embroider a sweet motif like flowers or hearts. Not sure what to embroider? It may be helpful to trace the small heart onto paper to sketch out different styles.NSB – heartfelt doily sketch
    Using your removable ink pen, plot your decoration on the smaller heart and embroider! I like to use flosses in colors that match the large heart for a cohesive look.NSB – heartfelt doily embroidered small heart
    When complete, rinse out the ink, if applicable.
  4. Layer the two hearts, right sides up, centering the smaller. Using a running stitch, sew the small heart to the large.NSB – heartfelt doily stitch together
  5. If desired, embroider a small motif in each of the scallops, using a color to match the small heart. This is a fun way to mimic or compliment your embroidered motifs in the small heart.NSB – heartfelt doily embroider scallops
    On the back, there will be two visible sets of stitches.NSB – heartfelt doily finished back
  6. Voila! NSB – heartfelt doily finished

 

3-D Valentine Ornament

  1. Using our templates (NSB heart felt valentines pattern sheet), cut two large hearts from one color of felt and four small hearts from another.NSB – heartfelt ornament cut hearts
  2. Using a sewing machine and thread, or a hand sewing needle with thread or floss, stitch the two large hearts together from center top to center bottom. This will create a total of four ‘arms’ that make up four large hearts.NSB – heartfelt ornament sew large hearts together
    Open between the two layers on each side and fold hearts on seamline.NSB – heartfelt ornament fold on seam
  3. Center one small heart over one of the larger hearts, aligning the bottom point and top dip of the small heart to the seam- or fold-line of the larger heart. Pin the layers together on one side (I like to pin the left side first). Turning the ‘arm’ so your unpinned side is facing away, center a second small heart over the larger heart that now faces up. Pin one side of the new small heart to the large heart, catching the unpinned side of the previous small heart.NSB – heartfelt ornament pin small hearts
    Repeat for all small hearts.
  4. Using a hand needle and embroidery floss that matches the larger hearts, begin sewing through three layers with a running stitch, working from the center top to the bottom around one side of the heart.
    Repeat for all four ‘arms’. You will have four stitched small hearts.NSB – heartfelt ornament repeat for all
  5. If you like, repeating the process of step 4, add an second row of stitches to the inside. Use a different shade of floss for visual interest.NSB – heartfelt ornament second color
    Repeat a third time, with another shade of floss, if you prefer.
  6. Your 3-D valentine is complete! If you want to make it into an ornament, sew a small loop of ribbon to the top center. Otherwise, hand it to someone you love!NSB – heartfelt ornament final

I hope you have enjoyed this tutorial! If hand embroidery is not your thing, consider using puff paint, glitter, sequins, buttons, or even printed fabric to help embellish your valentines!

Have a question or feedback? Please leave it in the comments below!

Quick and easy tote tutorial

This tote pattern was inspired by the best bag I ever had: big enough to carry a small selection of groceries or a creative project, but small enough that it never felt cumbersome. To expand on that bag’s great shape, I created three different sizes, each perfectly useful in its own right.

NSB - quick and easy tote tutorial header

The simplicity of this tote design provides so much opportunity to exercise creativity! Choose a fun printed fabric and embellish it with embroidery. Create some graphic patchwork and quilt it for additional texture. Paint your own fabric to be used for the outside. Make it in leather for a chic look.

This pattern goes together so quickly, I doubt you will want to make just one!

SUPPLIES

For all sizes, you will need:

  • Fashion fabric (I used printed cotton)
  • Lining fabric (I used printed cotton)
  • Webbing or ribbon for handles
  • Thread
  • Fusible fleece (optional; this adds body to the bag and stabilizes fabric)

TOOLS

  • Rotary cutter (recommended) or scissors
  • Quilter’s style see through ruler (I use 6.5” x 24”)
  • Self-healing mat (if using rotary cutter)
  • Marking tool (pen, pencil and chalk are all fine)
  • Sewing machine
  • Iron
  • Hand sewing needle (optional)

DIMENSIONS

quick and easy tote dimensions chart

Finished tote sizes:

  • The small tote finishes approximately 9.5” tall x 8.25” wide x 3.25” deep
  • The medium tote finishes approximately 12.25” t x 10.25” w x 4.25” d
  • The large tote finishes approximately 14.75” t x 12” w x 5.25” d

DIRECTIONS

For this tutorial, we show the construction of a medium tote. All seam allowances are 3/8”.

1. Cut fashion and lining fabrics to size. If using fusible fleece, follow manufacturer’s instructions to fuse to back of fashion fabric.NSB - quick and easy tote cut fabrics to size

2. For each piece of fashion fabric, find center point of top edge. Measure and mark the distance from center point according to dimensions chart (e.g. for medium tote, measure and mark 3” to either side for a total spacing of 6”).NSB - quick and easy tote mark center and strap spacing

Next, take one strap and align raw edge of webbing to raw edge of fabric along the top, matching to the  outside of the spacing mark.NSB - quick and easy tote align strap 1

Repeat with other end of strap and second spacing mark.NSB - quick and easy tote align strap 2

On sewing machine, baste straps in place (I like to sew 1/4” from the edge).NSB - quick and easy tote baste strap

3. Pin and sew one lining piece to fashion fabric along top edge using 3/8” seam allowance. NSB - quick and easy tote pin lining to outside

Repeat for second fashion fabric and lining pieces.NSB - quick and easy tote sew lining and outer pieces

Iron to set seam, then iron lining and fashion sides down (this will help create a clean finish along top edge).

4. Take one side and reopen; lay wrong side down. NSB - quick and easy tote lay wrong side down

Open second side and lay atop the first, right sides together, matching fashion fabrics and aligning the seams at edges.NSB - quick and easy tote pin tote pieces right sides together

Sew the two side seams and the bottom seam for the fashion fabric. On the bottom edge for the lining, leave a 4” to 5” opening in the center. **NOTE: it is best not to  backstitch at the corners, as these will be pressed open and cut off**NSB - quick and easy tote sew all sides leaving an opening at bottom of lining

Press flat.

5. Create the box bottom: in one corner, pull the two fabric pieces away from each other so the two seams match; press seams open. Using the ruler, measure and mark the length shown on the dimensions chart perpendicular to the seam line (e.g. for the medium tote, measure 4” from fold to fold). I find a quilting ruler marked with 45° angle to be particularly helpful to this task, as I can align with the folded edge. NSB - quick and easy tote mark box bottom outer fabricNSB - quick and easy tote mark box bottom lining

Sew on machine; be certain to backstitch at the edges. NSB - quick and easy tote sew box bottom

Trim seam allowance to 3/8”.

Repeat for all four corners. Press to set seams.

6. Turn the bag right side out through opening in bottom of lining.

Edge stitch the opening closed on the machine or blind stitch closed by hand.

NSB - quick and easy tote stitch opening closed

Fit the lining into the tote body, matching the box corners.

7. Iron the top edge (this is where that ironing in step 3 comes in handy). Pin in place, if desired.NSB - quick and easy tote iron top edge

Stitch around top 1/8” from edge; stitch again 1/4″ from edge.

8. Admire your new bag!


As mentioned above, there are many ways to personalize this tote!

In one version, I added a pocket to the lining…

…which would also work very well on the outside!NSB - reusable gift wrap large tote pocket outside

For another version, I used a printed fabric and a coordinating near solid for the lining. I added embroidery to the printed fabric and made a matching appliqué for the near solid. By finishing the ‘lining’ by hand, this becomes a reversible bag!

I hope you enjoy making your own version of this tote! If you have any questions, please leave them in the comments below!

Make a reusable advent calendar!

As I shared earlier this week, I love the way my reusable advent calendar turned out! I had so much fun making it, I thought others might enjoy making one, too, so I wrote up a tutorial. Check it out below!

NSB - reusable advent calendar header

A couple notes:

  • This tutorial walks through two different construction methods, starting with the more involved patchwork-style calendar and then looking at a simpler, non-patchwork calendar.
  • My calendar was designed with 25 days, rather than the more traditional 24 days. For this tutorial, I depict construction for 25 days, though I also include details & dimensions for 24 days and share a completed version after this tutorial.

 SUPPLIES

For the patchwork-style advent calendar with 25 days

  • 25 cuts of fabric 5” tall x 3.5” wide for windows
    • While I used many different fabrics, you could easily select just two fun prints or solid colors and alternate them.
  • Fabric with numbers for each day; while these can be as large as you please, they should be cut to a minimum of 1.5” square (including a ¼” seam allowance on each side)
  • 1/2 yard fabric for the pockets

For a non-patchwork calendar with 25 days

  • 5 cuts of fabric 5″ tall x 15.5″ wide for the ‘windows’
  • 5 cuts of fabric 6.5″ tall x 15.5″ wide for the pockets

For all 25 day calendars

  • 2/3 yard (approx.) fabric for the backing, facing/binding, and hanging sleeve
    • I used one fabric for the backing and a second for the facing and sleeve
  • 2/3 yard thin quilt batting or cotton flannel
  • Thread
    • I used three colors: light grey for piecing, red and green for quilting
  • Dowel for hanging (I use 3/8”)
  • Ribbon for hanging

TOOLS

  • Rotary cutter (recommended) or scissors
  • Quilter’s style see through ruler (I use 6.5” x 24”)
  • Self-healing cutting mat
  • Sewing machine
    • I used two needles: sharp for piecing and general construction, twin for quilting
  • Iron
  • Needle for hand sewing
  • Hera marker
  • Water- or air-erasable marking pen (optional)
  • Fabric safe tape (I like to use artist’s tape)
  • Quilt basting pins
  • Drill for adding holes to the dowel (optional)

Finished dimensions: 22.5” tall x 15” wide, each pocket finishes at 3” x 3”

Seam allowance is 1/4” throughout. For all piecing, sew fabrics with right sides together.

 

DIRECTIONS

PATCHWORK STYLE CALENDAR

Prepare your windows

If you are creating the patchwork style calendar, you will need one 5” tall x 3.5” wide cut for each day.

 

1. You will make five rows of five windows. Determine layout for the rows.

NSB - advent calendar window fabrics

 

 

2. Using a 1/4” seam allowance, sew together the five pieces of each row along the 5” long side, pressing seams open. Set rows aside.

NSB - ReuAdvCal piece windows

 

 

Prepare your numbers and pocket pieces

Some great ways to make your numbers include embroidery, cutting out and appliquéing felt numbers, using a number print fabric (either store bought or printed at home), painting numbers by hand, or using rubber stamps and a fabric ink pad. Numbers can be as big or as small as you like; I recommend somewhere between 1” and 2.5” in either direction.

 

3. For the patchwork style calendar, you will need to cut out each number so you have at least 1/2” on every side of the digit; each number should be a minimum of 1.5” in both height and width.

 NSB - advent calendar numbers

 

4. Begin piecing your numbers to the pocket fabric.

I will walk through the steps, but a quick view of order of construction will look like this:

Web

 

5.You will have to do some math based on the raw (unsewn) size of your numbers, but the aim is to have 3.5” wide raw pocket fronts for each number.

  • For example: if your individual unsewn number pieces are 1.5” square, you will need two 1.5” squares cut from the pocket fabric, in addition to a 1.5” x 3.5” rectangle (this allows for 1/4” seams on all pieces).
  • If your raw number pieces are 2.5” square, you will need two cuts at 2.5” x 1” and one 1” x 3.5” rectangle.
  • If your unsewn number pieces are 2” tall x 2.5” wide, you will need two pieces 2” x 1.25” and one 1.25” x 3.5” rectangle.

Basic quilt math: raw piece measurement – 0.5” = finished size. When in doubt: cut the raw pieces too big and trim after sewing.

 

Note: Keep track of the height measurement of the base piece you add to the number/sides.

 

6. Once you have cut the side and base pieces, sew the sides to your number, using a 1/4” seam allowance. Press seams toward outside. Trim, if necessary.

NSB - ReuAdvCal piece numbers to sides

 

7. Sew base piece to bottom of number/sides. Press seam down.

Repeat steps for all 25 numbers.

NSB - ReuAdvCal piece windows framed numbers

8. Lay out the framed number pieces in rows of five (1-5, 6-10, 11-15, 16-20, 21-25). Sew the five pieces of each row together, pressing seams open. Trim top of row, if necessary.

 

NSB - ReuAdvCal number row

 

9. It’s time for a little more math as you finish piecing the pocket panels. This next piece becomes the top of the pocket front and the pocket lining. Add the height measurement from the base piece to 3.25”. Cut five pieces that are this new dimension by 15.5” wide.

  • For example: if the base piece for framing the number is 1.25” tall x 3.5” wide, you add 1.25” to 3.25” for a sum of 4.5”, so you would cut five 4.5” tall x 15.5” wide pieces.

 

Sew each row of pocket fronts to one of these pieces. Press seam allowance toward the larger piece.

 

10. Turn full pocket panels face side down. Measure 3.25” up from the bottom front of the panel and use your hera marker to draw a line along the full width; this creates a crease that will allow you to fold the pocket panel with ease. When folded, there will be slight overhang on the bottom of the pocket panel back.

 

 

NSB - ReuAdvCal mark crease line

NSB - ReuAdvCal fold crease line

11. It is time to pad the pockets! If you are using quilt batting for your quilt, cut five pieces 3.25” tall x 15.5” wide. If you are using cotton flannel, cut five pieces 6.5” tall x 15.5” wide. For this tutorial, I am using batting.

With pocket panel laying open face down, place your pocket padding on the backside. If you are using batting, nestle one long edge along the crease you made with the hera marker.

***If using cotton flannel for padding, it is helpful to use the hera marker to draw a crease in the flannel just as for the pocket panel. At this step, nest the folded edge of the flannel inside the fold of the pocket piece.

NSB - ReuAdvCal pad pocket lay flat

Fold pocket around batting and pin in place.

NSB - ReuAdvCal pad pocket fold over

12. Sew through all layers close to the folded edge. I sewed my panels using two hues for additional cheer.

NSB - ReuAdvCal stitch pocket panel edge

13. Measuring from the folded edge, trim pocket panels to 3.25” tall.

NSB - ReuAdvCal trim pocket panel

Trim side edges of pockets panels, if necessary. Each pocket panel should be 15.5” wide.NSB - ReuAdvCal trim pocket panel edges

14. Place each pocket panel over its corresponding window panel, aligning bottom raw edges and pin in place.

NSB - ReuAdvCal align pocket panels to windowsNSB - ReuAdvCal pin pockets to windows

Baste the pocket panels to the window panels along the bottom edge.

NSB - ReuAdvCal baste pockets to windows

15. Sew the pocket/window rows together, ensuring the seams are aligned.

NSB - ReuAdvCal rows stitched together

16. To create a little depth to the pockets, we are going to press the seam allowances ‘up’. To start, press the seam allowances flat to set the stitches.

NSB - ReuAdvCal press calendar flat to set stitches

Starting with the top row, pocket front face down, use your steam iron to press the windows up.

NSB - ReuAdvCal press windows up

Next, understitch seam allowance to the base of the windows.

NSB - ReuAdvCal understitch seam allowances

Using your steam iron, press the pocket panel up. Pin into place to prevent flapping.

NSB - ReuAdvCal press pockets up

Repeat for rows two, three, and four; the bottom row should be left flat.

NSB - ReuAdvCal calendar ready to sandwich

17. Next, create a quilt sandwich:

Cut the batting or cotton flannel so it is somewhat larger that your calendar front; cut the backing fabric so it is larger than the batting/flannel.

Lay your backing fabric (right side down) on a clean, flat surface. Smooth the fabric and secure the perimeter with tape. Layer your batting or cotton flannel over the backing fabric, smoothing so it lays flat, then layer the calendar front (right side up) over the batting.

Starting in the center of the calendar front and moving outward, pin baste through all layers.

NSB - ReuAdvCal make quilt sandwich

Quilt sandwich: ready to go!

18. To create the individual pockets, quilt straight lines from the top to the bottom, centered between numbers.

 

The seam lines between windows and numbers double as excellent guides, but it may be helpful to mark your quilting lines. Columns should be marked as 3” wide.

NSB - ReuAdvCal layers quilted

I used a twin needle with thread in two colors to achieve a festive look.

NSB - advent calendar pocket rows

19. Trim the quilted calendar so it is 23” tall and 15.5” wide.

NSB - ReuAdvCal trim calendar

  1. Finish the edges by adding a facing. This tutorial from Victoria Gertenbach offers very clear step-by-step instructions.

 NSB - ReuAdvCal add facing

21. In order to hang the calendar, you will need to sew a hanging sleeve to the back. I like this tutorial from Jacquie Gering, though I cut my piece 4.5” tall (the sleeve will finish as 2”, which is more appropriate for a quilted piece of this size).

NSB - ReuAdvCal add hanging sleeve

22. Cut your dowel to the finished width of your calendar and drill two small holes for your ribbon (I like to drill just beyond the width of my finished hanging sleeve).

NSB - ReuAdvCal hanging sleeve and dowel

23. String ribbon through the holes…

NSB - ReuAdvCal string ribbon through holes

…and hang it up!

NSB - reusable advent calendar complete

Enjoy using your reusable advent calendar for the first time!

 

NON-PATCHWORK CALENDAR

Prepare your windows

For the non-patchwork style calendar, you will need five cuts of fabric 5” tall x 15.5” wide. Iron and set aside.

Prepare your pocket pieces

For the non-patchwork calendar, you will add your numbers directly to the pocket fabric. Begin by marking guidelines on the five 6.5” x 15.5” pieces with the marking pen:

  • Measure 3.25” up from one long edge and mark the full 15.5” width
  • Measure 7.75” in from one short edge and lightly mark on each edge and on the marked line
  • From center point, measure and mark 1.5” to the right, along the full 6.5” height.
  • From this new line, measure 3” to the right and mark the full height
  • Repeat last two steps to the left of the marked center point

You will have two rows of boxes; on the bottom row of each piece, add your numbers inside the guidelines using your preferred method. The five pieces should be numbered 1-5, 6-10, 11-15, 16-20, 21-25.

 Print

After preparing all fabric pieces, follow steps 10 through 23 as for the patchwork style calendar.

 

24 DAY ADVENT CALENDAR

I reworked the layout of my 25 day calendar a bit for those who prefer a more traditional 24 day advent calendar.

NSB - ReuAdvCal 24 day non-patchwork

This is the layout for the 24 day calendar, made following the non-patchwork instructions. The numbers were cut out of felt and stitched to the pocket fronts with embroidery floss.

Alternate dimensions, supplies, and directions are as follows:

For either style of calendar (patchwork or non-patchwork) with 24 days

Updated row layout is four rows of six numbers (1-6, 7-12, 13-18, 19-24).

Finished dimensions of the 24 day calendar are: 18” tall x 18” wide (pockets still finish 3” x 3”).

 

SUPPLIES (24 days):

For the patchwork-style advent calendar with 24 days

  • 24 cuts of fabric 5” tall x 3.5” wide for windows
  • Fabric with numbers for the 24 days, can be as large as you please though they should be cut to a minimum of 1.5” square (including a ¼” seam allowance on each side)
  • 1/2 yard fabric for pockets

 

For a non-patchwork calendar with 24 days

  • 4 cuts of fabric 5” tall x 18.5” wide for the ‘windows’
  • 4 cuts of fabric 6.5” tall x 18.5” wide for the pockets

 

All other supplies and tools as listed for 25 days calendar

 

 

For 24 day patchwork calendar

Alt.9: cut the pocket lining piece as calculated height x 18.5” wide.

 

For either 24 day calendar

Alt.11: cut batting as 3.25” tall x 18.5” wide or cotton flannel as 6.5” tall x 18.5” wide.

 

Alt.13: pocket panels should be 18.5” wide.

 

Alt.16: follow the steps for rows one, two, and three; row four should be left flat.

Reusable advent calendar

Who can believe it is already December 1st? As we start counting down the days to the holidays, I thought it would be fun to share a handmade project that helps to do exactly that!

Inspired by one of my favorite holiday traditions, I decided it would be great to make an advent calendar that can be reused from one year to the next.

NSB - reusable advent calendar header

When designing this calendar, I wanted to capture the essence of the classic window style advent calendar, choosing to feature individual fabrics for the days. In lieu of doors, I created small pockets, which can be filled with a variety of objects, like small gifts or treats.

After determining the size and shape of this advent calendar, I began pulling fabrics from my stash, picking out a few novelty prints, which all have a fun, retro quality, and then selecting coordinating prints and yarn-dyes from our store. My color palette ended up as classic red and green, which I updated slightly by adding a pale grey for the pockets and any framing for smaller cuts.

NSB - advent calendar window fabrics

Inspired by talented embroidery artists, like Yoko Saito, Rebecca Ringquist, and my coworkers Susan and Kitrina, I decided to embroider the numbers for each pocket. I began by finding a font I liked for the numbers (Desdemona), which I printed onto Sticky Fabri-Solvy™. To pick up the colors in my fabrics, I selected three hues each in red and green.

NSB - advent calendar embroidery supplies

I had fun experimenting with different stitches and let the shapes of the numbers inform some of my designs. For a bit more visual interest, I embroidered the even numbers in green and odd numbers in red, adding an occasional silver stitch for effect.

NSB - advent calendar pocket rows

I am particularly fond of the last row of numbers, because each number has some red and some green. Plus, 22 is a pair of candy canes and 24 is a little house, which were so fun to stitch out.

Though embroidering the numbers took some time, the rest of the construction was very simple. And I am so pleased with the result!

NSB - reusable advent calendar complete

While the calendar I made will house little treats and gifts, in keeping with the concept of reusability, I love the idea of filling each pocket with an ornament that can be added to the tree after retrieving from the calendar. Alternately, it would be very fun to track the days by moving a small holiday token forward each day.

If you like this calendar – and want to make one for yourself – stay tuned later this week for a tutorial on how to make one of your very own!

Easy, elegant infinity scarf tutorial

It is hard to believe that there are only eight weeks left in 2015! In preparation of the holidays, we have planned several great tutorials for quick gifts and holiday cheer.

Today, we’re kicking off the how-to series with a fast and fun project that is perfect as a gift or as an addition to one’s own wardrobe!


Now that autumn is truly underway in Seattle, we are starting to break out our cold-weather accessories. One of our favorites is the easy-to-wear infinity scarf. And did you know? They are incredibly simple and quick to make!

NSB - infinity scarf header

Whether you are in the market for a scarf that is super casual or perfectly elegant, this pattern is a great place to start. This pattern looks awesome in novelty knits, cozy in flannel, fabulous in faux fur, and magnificent in velvet!

This project takes about 30 minutes to complete and the finished product is so satisfying!

SUPPLIES

  • Fabric*
    • One or two 2/3 yard cuts of 44” wide fabric
      OR
    • One 2/3 yard cut of 60” wide fabric
  • Thread to match

*If you are making your scarf with 60” wide fabric, it will comfortably loop twice. If you use one length of 44″ wide fabric your scarf will not wrap, but if your scarf is made with two lengths of 44” wide fabric your scarf will loop three times! If you use two lengths of 44” wide fabric, consider using two different colors, prints, or even fabric qualities for additional appeal. I think combining burnout velvet and silk charmeuse in coordinating colors would be amazing.

TOOLS

  • Sewing machine
  • Iron
  • Needle for hand sewing

DIRECTIONS

1. If using two 24″ lengths of 44” wide fabric: layer the two pieces right sides together, sew together along one 24” edge using a ½” seam allowance. Press seam open.

No preparation is needed if using a single length of fabric.

NSB - infinity scarf fabric

For this tutorial, I selected a cool, 60″ wide novelty knit: two-color french terry with holes in varying sizes. Though the ‘right side’ of this quality is the darker side, I oped to use the terry-loop side as the face.

2. Fold fabric lengthwise, right sides together. Mark 4” in from both ends.

NSB - inf sc mark 4 inches

Stitch between two marks using a ½” seam allowance. Iron seam.

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3. Turn the tube right side out.

NSB - inf sc turn right side out

Matching right sides together, stitch across the short ends. Press seam open.

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**Optional** If you like the look of a Möbius scarf, add a twist or two to the length of the scarf before stitching the short ends together. This looks especially nice if using a single length of 44” wide fabric.

4. Hand stitch the remaining opening closed and turn the seam to the inside of the scarf.

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5. Your scarf is complete! Put it on and get cozy!

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Rococo ribbon rosettes

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Rococo ribbon is a fantastic ¼” wide 100% polyester ribbon with gradient color across the width and picot edging on both sides. We love this ribbon for many reasons, including its versatility in application and its ability as a trim to pull disparate fabrics together.

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Today we are sharing a quick and easy-to-make flower using this fabulous ribbon! This little flower is the perfect addition to clothing (especially when sewn in clusters!), gifts and handmade cards, doll clothing and accessories, and so much more.

We made a fun short video tutorial to show you how to make a Rococo rosette. Hope you enjoy!

SUPPLIES & TOOLS

  • ‘Rococo’ ribbon, minimum cut of 3” (can substitute any 100% polyester ribbon in its stead, though you will need more length if you use a wider ribbon); each length will make two flowers
  • scissors
  • lighter or candle (flame needs to be accessible, so recommend tapers over votives)
  • ruler
  • floral stamens (optional)

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Cut a 3” to 4” length of ribbon
  2. Cut ribbon length in half at an angle
  3. Using lighter or candle, melt the squared end of the ribbon
  4. On the long angled cut, find and pull a thread close to the ribbon’s edge; this will create the gathers along the full ribbon length
  5. Holding gathers in place, use your flame to melt the angled cut edge
  6. Voila! You have made a Rococo ribbon rosette!
  7. Repeat steps 3 through 5 with the second half of your ribbon;
  8. Optional: If you want to add stamens, fold in half and insert into the flowers center; catch in place when sewing to your project

Embroidered ‘Guest Book’ Tablecloth

Today we are sharing a fun project that makes a fabulous keepsake to commemorate weddings, new homes, and more!

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Inspired by one of our customers, who uses a linen tablecloth to remember all the visitors to her house, we decided this project would make a unique and fun guest book for a wedding reception! One of the best parts: this can be added to throughout the years!

Our guest book tablecloth is a very simple project; it just requires time and basic embroidery skills (though it can certainly be made more challenging if you prefer 😉 ).

We start by embroidering a pretty heart motif, along with the couple’s names and their wedding date to the center of a tablecloth.

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At the reception, guests use a washable ink pen to sign their names and well wishes on the tablecloth.

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We then make their signatures permanent by embroidering over them for posterity. The result is a lovely keepsake tablecloth!

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Interested in making a guest book tablecloth? Follow our quick tutorial below!

Guest Book Tablecloth Tutorial

We love all the opportunity for customization this project provides! This would make a lovely housewarming gift for a first home, including the tools needed to make it an ongoing project! It would also be fabulous for a 50th anniversary party! Making one for newlyweds? Incorporate their wedding motif or monogram and colors into the cloth! If it’s for someone who loves color, do the signatures in different hues! Alternately, use embroidery floss in a shade similar to the color of the cloth for a sophisticated, textured monochrome palette.

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SUPPLIES

  • Tablecloth for ‘guest book’; can be store-bought or hand-made (we made ours from 60” wide Essex, a linen/cotton blend, in white)
  • Embroidery pattern (commercial or your own motif)
  • Embroidery floss (for our central motif we used four shades each of leaf greens and rosy pinks-to-reds, plus a variegated brown and for all lettering we used a dark grey)
  • Washable ink pen for reception

TOOLS

  • Embroidery hoop
  • Needles
  • Iron

NOTE: We used an iron-on commercial pattern transfer for the heart motif and created our wording on the computer. If you want to use your own motif (e.g. your wedding motif or couples’ monogram) and do an iron transfer, be certain to make a mirror image of your motif to ensure you transfer correctly. You can also print as normal and trace your motif by hand using a light-box.

1. After determining where you would like your motif placed on the tablecloth, transfer your embroidery pattern.

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2. Embroider the motif.

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A note: some commercial embroidery patterns include specific color guides, but ours did not. We found the perfect inspiration in a tea saucer!

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We used satin stitch for our floral heart motif and the couple’s names and backstitched the date.

When embroidery is complete, iron tablecloth in preparation of the event.

3. At wedding, lay out tablecloth with pens available for signing. To ensure no guest’s signature would impose on our main embroidery, we made a dotted outline around it.

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4. Using a simple stitch, embroider over guests signatures. We used a backstitch, which has a clean look and really allows the personality of each signature to shine.

Once your embroidery is complete, wash out the ink (according to the pen’s instructions when applicable), dry, iron. Your new tablecloth is ready for use!

NSB - emb tc tutorial finished tablecloth